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'Fiat Lux: Politics of Truth, Theology and the Event'

Talk on the political theology of the Event, by Professor Michael Dillon (University of Lancaster)

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The organization of a politics of truth around the trope of the event is hardly novel as the title reference to Genesis Verse 3 in The King James Version of the Bible indicates. The event has never been that which simply happens. The time of the event, however conceived, is ruptured eschatologically. This rupture spaces time out. It creates an interval which, as Badiou observed, ‘is a space of consequences.’ Whereas the evental eschaton of revealed religion signalled the threshold obtaining onto-theologically between the transcendent and the immanent, in which the space of consequences was acted out governmentally as redemptive politics, for modern finitudinal accounts of time, the evental eschaton functions to punctuate the infinity of finitudinal orders instead. Here Badiou’s space of consequences takes a governmental as well as revolutionary form. My concern is with the governmental, specifically that of global liberal governance and the eschatological rupture of its account of the event as the catastrophic emergency of emergence that distinguishes its evental account of Life.

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Week beginning 18th February
February 2013

Content last modified: 16 Jul 2014

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