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Colonial debts, extractive nostalgias, imperial insolvencies – Reimagining financialization

September 22 & 23, 10am-4pm Goldsmiths, University of London Deptford Town Hall – Council Chamber   This two-day workshop aims to bring together interested interdisciplinary scholars and thinkers who want to explore the historical and contemporary links between the financialization and colonialism at the intersection of social and cultural criticism and political economy. We are hoping […]

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Remembering the ‘Big Bang’ – financial deregulation 30 years on

In 1984, Conservative MP John Redwood – described as the ‘consumate financial politician’ – birthed a fairy tale “Tilting at Castles” which would come to reshape the City of London, the Conservative Party and Britain. Redwood, the head of Margaret Thatcher’s No.10 Policy Unit told a tale that would result in the Big Bang deregulation of the […]

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Critters, Critics, and Californian Theory – review of Haraway’s Staying with the Trouble

Donna Haraway, Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, (Duke University Press, 2016) From the opening, Donna Haraway’s recent book reads like a nice hybrid of theoretical conversation and science fiction. Crescendoing in the closing Camille Stories, the outcome of a writing experiment of imagining five future generations, “Staying with the trouble” weaves together […]

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Trust, Power and Public Relations in Financial Markets

Trust, Power and Public Relations in Financial Markets is the new book by PERC’s own Clea Bourne (2017: Routledge). The book is published as a part of Routledge’s New Directions in Public Relations & Communication Research that publishes critical and challenging responses to contemporary PR thinking and practice. What makes this book unique is that it unpacks the profitable […]

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The death and life of Britain’s technocratic centre

The 2017 General Election has turned out to be an argument about universality. In Labour’s case, that is relatively obvious. Key policies, such as free university tuition and free school lunches, involve re-introducing free and universal services, in areas where policy orthodoxy had switched towards conditionality of various kinds. The New Labour argument, that universality […]

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The uncanniness of climate – Review of Morton’s Hyperobjects

Timothy Morton cares about the humans and things with which he co-exists, and doesn’t want to see them destroyed. But reading Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World,  it’s not entirely clear why. It’s certainly not for any anthropocentric reasons, such as the inability of humans to flourish in a degraded environment. […]

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Rethinking Economics conference – 1st July

Rethinking Economics in a Post-truth World Goldsmiths, University of London Saturday 1st July 2017 09:30am – 6:00pm The rise of populism and ‘post-truth’ politics is a rejection of a narrow, technocratic vision of economics. The distance between technical economic expertise and the democratic public sphere is a failing of economics. How can alternative perspectives on […]

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A Progressive Anthropocene?: The Breakthrough Institute’s Love Your Monsters

Michael Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus (eds), Love Your Monsters: Postenvironmentalism and the Anthropocene (Breakthrough Institute, 2011) The Breakthrough Institute asserts that ecomodernism can give us a “Good Anthropocene”.  But in aiming at a second naivety of progressive modernism, it mistakenly treats nature as though it were a human creation. In 2007 Michael Shellenberger and Ted […]

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