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Edward is still with us: Jean Mohr reflects on Edward Said in Palestine & After the Last Sky

Jean Mohr

After the Last Sky came about after Jean Mohr was commissioned by the UN, to take photos of some of the key sites in which Palestinians lived their lives. Because the UN allowed only minimal text (the names of places) to accompany the photographs, Said and Mohr decided to work together on an 'interplay', as Said put it, of Said's personal account of Palestinian suffering and exile and Mohr's photographs – 'an unconventional, hybrid, and fragmentary [form] of expression' - which they called After the Last Sky (1986). The Space and Gaze exhibition at Goldsmiths (September 2013 – July 2014) brings Mohr's images and Said's text from this seminal book together for the first time. Working against the grain of speeded up short durations in gallery spaces and the cultural sector more widely, we have chosen to live and converse with the images and texts for the longer duration of an academic year. Against the grain of the corporatization of the academy, the exhibition claims the space for an alternative writing on the walls of the university.

Wed, 02 Apr 14 2

Committed Sociology

Jacob Fritze, Ellta Woldermariam, Dr Lez Henry, Bev Skeggs, Les Back, Marie Carver-Hughes

Committed Sociology: the Annual A Level Sociology conference at Christ The King, 6th March, 2014 Les Back talks about commitment and sociology's purpose with Professor Bev Skeggs and Dr Lez Henry. The theme of committed sociology was the focus of this year's sixth form conference at Christ The King College, Lewisham. The podcast also includes interviews with Marie Carver-Hughes the teacher behind the conference and sociology student Ellta Woldermariam with music played by Jacob Fritze.

Tue, 01 Apr 14 2

Death and the Migrant

Yasmin Gunaratnam

‘To outline the experience of the migrant worker and to relate this to what surrounds him – both physically and historically’ John Berger has asserted, is to grasp more surely the political reality of the world at this moment’. The ‘this moment’ that Berger was referring to was 1970s Europe. At that time migration was largely the province of men. Parodying the myth of infinite substitution and the denial of the migrant worker’s susceptibility and finitude in global capitalism, Berger wrote, 'So far as the economy of the metropolitan country is concerned,migrant workers are immortal: immortal because continually interchangeable.They are not born:they are not brought up and they do not age:they do not get tired:they do not die.' Along with the capacity for mobility, reinvention and resilence required of migrants, there is another more infirm side to our world on the move that deserves greater recognition and understanding. Attending to the situation of the migrant at times of illness and death is to open ourselves to the coming together of two of the most radical thresholds of bodily estrangement and vulnerability: the movement across territories and from life to death.

Sun, 30 Mar 14 2

When music is your only friend

Gerry Prince

‘To outline the experience of the migrant worker and to relate this to what surrounds him – both physically and historically’ John Berger has asserted, is to grasp more surely the political reality of the world at this moment’. The ‘this moment’ that Berger was referring to was 1970s Europe. At that time migration was largely the province of men. Parodying the myth of infinite substitution and the denial of the migrant worker’s susceptibility and finitude in global capitalism, Berger wrote, 'So far as the economy of the metropolitan country is concerned,migrant workers are immortal: immortal because continually interchangeable.They are not born:they are not brought up and they do not age:they do not get tired:they do not die.' Along with the capacity for mobility, reinvention and resilence required of migrants, there is another more infirm side to our world on the move that deserves greater recognition and understanding. Attending to the situation of the migrant at times of illness and death is to open ourselves to the coming together of two of the most radical thresholds of bodily estrangement and vulnerability: the movement across territories and from life to death.

Sun, 30 Mar 14 2

GUESTures

Margareta Kern

‘To outline the experience of the migrant worker and to relate this to what surrounds him – both physically and historically’ John Berger has asserted, is to grasp more surely the political reality of the world at this moment’. The ‘this moment’ that Berger was referring to was 1970s Europe. At that time migration was largely the province of men. Parodying the myth of infinite substitution and the denial of the migrant worker’s susceptibility and finitude in global capitalism, Berger wrote, 'So far as the economy of the metropolitan country is concerned,migrant workers are immortal: immortal because continually interchangeable.They are not born:they are not brought up and they do not age:they do not get tired:they do not die.' Along with the capacity for mobility, reinvention and resilence required of migrants, there is another more infirm side to our world on the move that deserves greater recognition and understanding. Attending to the situation of the migrant at times of illness and death is to open ourselves to the coming together of two of the most radical thresholds of bodily estrangement and vulnerability: the movement across territories and from life to death.

Sun, 30 Mar 14 2