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Managing Race: From the Wages of Whiteness to the Production of Difference

Elizabeth Esch

The persistence of racism in structuring life possibilities across the globe and in offering ideological explanations for those structures is a pressing concern of activists and intellectuals. Yet while broad agreement that “race matters” may exist there is little in the way of agreement about how and why race happens – why it came into being historically, how it continues, who benefits from it and how it should be challenged. In their recent work The Production of Difference: Race and the Management of Labor in US History, David Roediger and Elizabeth Esch offer an examination of race as pursued and promoted through managerial practice and thought in multiple labor systems and industries. They show how the racial category “white” came to be linked to managerial supremacy in the contexts of colonial settlement, slavery and industrial production. The study builds on and enhances previous studies of race and work that have sought to take seriously the problem of working class racism. In considering the claim advanced by architects of transnational US capitalism that they possess a particularly acute ability to manage through race the authors offer a new entry point to examine the persistence of race in capitalism.

Sun, 30 Mar 14 2

Managing Race: From the Wages of Whiteness to the Production of Difference

David Roediger

The persistence of racism in structuring life possibilities across the globe and in offering ideological explanations for those structures is a pressing concern of activists and intellectuals. Yet while broad agreement that “race matters” may exist there is little in the way of agreement about how and why race happens – why it came into being historically, how it continues, who benefits from it and how it should be challenged. In their recent work The Production of Difference: Race and the Management of Labor in US History, David Roediger and Elizabeth Esch offer an examination of race as pursued and promoted through managerial practice and thought in multiple labor systems and industries. They show how the racial category “white” came to be linked to managerial supremacy in the contexts of colonial settlement, slavery and industrial production. The study builds on and enhances previous studies of race and work that have sought to take seriously the problem of working class racism. In considering the claim advanced by architects of transnational US capitalism that they possess a particularly acute ability to manage through race the authors offer a new entry point to examine the persistence of race in capitalism.

Sun, 30 Mar 14 2

Visual images of neighbourhoods – how reliably can they predict who lives where?

Richard Webber

The originator of the Mosaic and Acorn neighbourhood classifications, Richard Webber is associated with the use of “commercial sociology” and “big data” as alternatives source of evidence in the social sciences to the traditional research questionnaire. Geodemographic classifications such as Mosaic and Acorn associate each postcode with categories such as “New Urban Colonists”, “Rustbelt Resilience” or “Summer Playgrounds” based on the demographics of their residents. He is also visiting professor in the geography department at Kings College London.

Mon, 03 Mar 14 0

Frontstaging the urban backstage? The politics of infrastructure disruptions

Steve Graham

Stephen Graham is Professor of Cities and Society at Newcastle University's School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape. His research addresses the complex links between urban places and mobilities, infrastructures, militarization, survieillance, security and war. His books include 'Telecommunications and the City', 'Splintering Urbanism' (both with Simon Marvin), 'Disrupted Cities: When Infrastructures Fail' and 'Cities Under Siege: The New Military Urbanism'. His next book, "Vertical: The Politics of Up and Down' (Verso) is currently in preparation.

Mon, 03 Mar 14 0

Class and Elites in Britain: findings from the BBC’s Great British Class Survey

Mike Savage

In this talk, Mike will discuss "the paradox of class". This is the idea that that overt class politics and consciousness decline as divisions become more entrenched. He draws on research from the BBC’s Great British Class Survey and the public reaction to its findings as the mainstay of his presentation and will reflect more broadly on one of the striking findings from the GBCS regarding the increasingly striking distinctiveness of a small elite class.

Mon, 24 Feb 14 0