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Relations... Objects... Immanence... Absolute?

Ben Noys

The contemporary theorization of art inhabits a series of often interlocking positions concerning the virtues or vices of objects, relations, and immanence. The key term is immanence, which slides between a militant excess and the untranscendable horizon of capitalist value. Analysing the tensions of immanence - between theological transcendence and immersion, between relation and dissolution - requires an analysis of the attempt to disembed objects, relations, and immanence from the horizon of capitalist metrics.

Fri, 01 Nov 13 0

Inaugural Lecture: Forensic Architecture

Eyal Weizman

Professor Eyal Weizman, Department of Visual Cultures, delivers his inaugural lecture. He uses the groundbreaking work of the forensic architecture team in places of conflict, such as Palestine, Pakistan and Guatemala to critically evaluate the politics and aesthetics of contemporary forms of spatial investigation.

Thu, 24 Oct 13 0

Political Phobia: Guattari, Lacan, and Semiocapitalism

Professor Janell Watson

Can those of us who dwell in 21st-century metropolises learn anything from Freud’s famous child patient Hans? Hans develops a phobia of horses and the street. Freud diagnoses a deviance in sexual development. Lacan detects a reluctance to enter into the symbolic order. Félix Guattari instead celebrates Hans’s phobia as a pragmatic political escape from an Oedipalization which serves capitalism by forming deterritorialized workers who are also adaptable consumers. For Guattari, Hans exemplifies the axiomatic of capital. This talk rereads the story of Hans as an early chapter in the genealogy of flexible labor.

Thu, 17 Oct 13 0

Speculative Realism and Post-Continuity

Professor Steven Shaviro

In this lecture, Professor Shaviro will explore "post-continuity" styles in recent American cinema, and consider the ways in which these styles can be understood in relation to contemporary philosophies of Speculative Realism.

Thu, 10 Oct 13 0