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Carys Evans

Staff details

PositionTeaching Fellow
Department Psychology
Email c.evans (@gold.ac.uk)
Phone+44 (0)20 896 2798
Carys Evans

My main research areas include cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychology. A majority of my research has explored two main topics: 1) the role of the parietal lobe in object-use and 2) the therapeutic effects of brain stimulation on mood.

These topics have been explored using the brain stimulation techniques transcranial direct current (tDCS) and random noise (tRNS) stimulation or through behavioural work with stroke patients with apraxia. Generally, I am interested in examining dissociations in processing in order to better understand neurological illness. For more detail about these topics please see Research Interests. 

I am a member of the GoldAge and Banissy Labs.

Academic Qualifications

2016 – Postdoctoral Research, Goldsmiths, University of London

2015 – PhD, Northumbria University, Newcastle

2011 – MSc Cognitive Neuroscience, Durham University

2010 – BSc (Hons) Applied Psychology, Durham University

Teaching and Supervision

Foundation Year – PS50006B (applications of psychology) Psychology & Life

BSc Year 1 – PS51008C Design and Analysis of Psychological Investigations

BSc Year 2 – PS52007B Research Methods in Psychology

BSc Year 2 – Tutorial Leader

Project Supervision

I am interested in supervising projects involving any of the techniques or topics listed below, but I am also excited to discuss any other research ideas that fall into the fields of cognitive neuroscience or neuropsychology.

  • Transcranial magnetic (TMS) / direct current (tDCS) / random noise (tRNS) stimulation – these can be used to explore a variety of cognitive functions.
  • Perception and action.
  • Motor planning and control.
  • Object use.
  • Motor imagery / action observation / imitation.

For appointments please email me at c.evans@gold.ac.uk.

Research Interests

Using different neuroimaging techniques, my current research explores the following topics:

Mood: Brain stimulation has been shown to alleviate symptoms of depression in young adults, demonstrating its potential as an alternative therapeutic technique. Few studies have explored the efficacy of this technique in different populations. As part of a collaborative project, we are assessing whether the effect of brain stimulation on mood is dependent upon the age of the individual and their trait mood. We are also interested in whether one type of stimulation is more effective than another.

Motor imagery: Requiring a similar neural network to motor execution, motor imagery is the dynamic simulation of a motor act. It is critical in movement planning, passive observation of action, and action imitation. Research indicates that motor imagery is a useful training tool to improve proficiency in sport. I am particularly interested in whether motor imagery can enhance motor recovery in neurological disorders such as stroke, by improving the reconnection of damaged neural networks. I am also keen to assess whether neuromodulation can help repair these networks.

Apraxia: Whilst people with apraxia can identify objects and grasp them based on their size and location, errors occur during functional use of objects (e.g. cutting paper with scissors). These mistakes may reflect deficient generation of internal representations of movement (i.e. motor imagery). I am interested in assessing the integrity of motor imagery in apraxia by using a combination of action perception and execution tasks.

Visual Pathways Model: Classically divided into the ventral and dorsal streams, I am interested in how these pathways integrate information in order to accurately grasp or use objects. Evidence suggests an additional “ventro-dorsal” sub-stream is recruited when perceptual information must be incorporated into action plans during skilled movement (e.g. object-use). Using brain stimulation, my previous research assessed whether the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL) is the critical juncture where visual and semantic information is integrated.

Publications

Article

Dissociation between Semantic Representations for Motion and Action Verbs: Evidence from Patients with Left Hemisphere Lesions
Taylor, Lawrence J.; Evans, Carys; Greer, Joanna; Senior, Carl; Coventry, Kenny R.; Ietswaart, Magdalena and UNSPECIFIED. 2017. Dissociation between Semantic Representations for Motion and Action Verbs: Evidence from Patients with Left Hemisphere Lesions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, pp. 11-45. ISSN 1662-5161

Perceptual decisions regarding object manipulation are selectively impaired in apraxia or when tDCS is applied over the left IPL
Evans, Carys; Edwards, Martin G.; Taylor, Lawrence J. and Ietswaart, Magdalena. 2016. Perceptual decisions regarding object manipulation are selectively impaired in apraxia or when tDCS is applied over the left IPL. Neuropsychologia, 86, pp. 153-166. ISSN 0028-3932

Impaired Communication Between the Dorsal and Ventral Stream: Indications from Apraxia
Evans, Carys; Edwards, Martin G.; Taylor, Lawrence J. and Ietswaart, Magdalena. 2016. Impaired Communication Between the Dorsal and Ventral Stream: Indications from Apraxia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10,

In search for the core of apraxia
Ietswaart, Magdalena and Evans, Carys. 2014. In search for the core of apraxia. Cortex, 57, pp. 283-285. ISSN 0010-9452

Optic ataxia affects the lower limbs: Evidence from a single case study
Evans, Carys; Milner, A. David; Humphreys, Glyn W. and Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana. 2012. Optic ataxia affects the lower limbs: Evidence from a single case study. Cortex, 49(5), pp. 1229-1240. ISSN 0010-9452