Navigation

Educational Studies future careers

Article

A degree in Educational Studies from Goldsmiths prepares you for a career in teaching. However, it also opens up a wide range of other careers because of the skills that you develop during the programme of study.

What skills will I gain from an Educational Studies degree?

The skills you'll gain include creative thinking, active listening, clarity of communication, planning ahead and effective organisation, to name a few. These are all attractive to employers.

What kinds of industries do Educational Studies students work in?

A large proportion of our graduates go into teaching but many also get employed in teaching support roles such as teaching assistants and educational psychologists, as well as positions in areas such as policy making, administration and technical support.

You can also use your skills and knowledge in areas outside of education including community arts/education, the police and probation services, youth/social work and charities.

Where do Educational Studies students work?

Teaching posts are available in a wide variety of settings including  primary and secondary schools, FE and HE colleges, universities, hospitals, prisons and detention centres, training organisations and museums and galleries

You may also be attracted to other roles in an educational setting, but with less direct contact with children or young people. These include administration and support, management, finance, libraries, careers and welfare advice and IT and technical support. 

Some of our recent graduates are now employed by institutions like Westminster Kingsway College, St Thomas a Becket Catholic Primary School and Birmingham Royal Ballet. 

Educational Studies graduate stories:

Mariann

Photo of Mariann
"The course provided me with the necessary theoretical background, inspiration and confidence to move my practice into a direction that focuses on creating a dynamic learning experience and dialogue between participants."

"I'm a Head of Curriculum Development, designing and developing school-wide and individualised curriculum for learners with autism spectrum disorders. The course has challenged me to re-evaluate my practice as an artist and educator. It provided me with the necessary theoretical background, inspiration and confidence to move my practice into a direction that focuses on creating a dynamic learning experience and dialogue between participants. From September, I also took on a role in a Saturday school to lead a youth group for Hungarian teenagers. Through shared investigations and creative practices, the group explore the questions of culture, language and identity. The school's aim is to provide a platform for bilingual children, teenagers and adults to engage in learning experiences of Hungarian folk art, music and dance; therefore preserve their first language/mother tongue, culture and traditions." 

Related content