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Self-Building Events

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Project Events

January 2014

Creating a nation of selfbuilders

The first dissemination event for the research project Self-building: the production and consumption of new homes from the perspective of households reported the findings from the survey of selfbuilders and potential selfbuilders carried out as part of the project. It also presented an initial analysis of the interviews with industry professionals and key stakeholders that illustrated clearly the structures that shape the selfbuild sector in England today, both presenting opportunities and constraints to the development of a specific market.

There were two outputs for the event, an interim report, which you can download below, and a Prezi Creating a Nation of Selfbuilders, which includes a voice over to talk through the key points.

Goldsmiths also ran a news story on their website during National Seflbuild Week 2014 which included infographics based on the research findings.

March 2015

Revisiting Segal: Learning from the Lewisham Selfbuild Schemes

Date: 19 March 2015
Time: 7-9pm
Location: RHB Cinema, Goldsmiths

This event showcases the support that Lewisham provided for self build housing in the 1970s and 1980s. Given the current problems relating to housing in London, it is timed to get the conversation going once more about the innovation that Lewisham historically led in this form of housing. These innovative schemes, supported and led by Lewisham council in the 1970s and 1980s were a way of providing social housing through self build. The event includes a showing of the BBC Open Door programme The House that Mum and Dad built (1982) that captures the experiences of families involved in the first project, Segal Close and a discussion led by people who were involved in the various Segal schemes rolled out in Lewisham at this time.

 

May 2015

What can we learn from selfbuilders? Giving selfbuilders voice in ongoing discussions on supporting selfbuild in the United Kingdom

This briefing event presents the findings of ongoing ethnographic research with selfbuilders to government and industry stakeholders. It intends to contribute to ongoing discussions about how to mainstream selfbuild within new housing provision, by bringing to the table a series of recommendations informed by the research.

September 2015

Remembering the social in alternative housing

This event marks the end of the project, and locates the project findings in a wider field of research on and interest in housing. More details will be available closer to the time.