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A list of our past events in 2010.

Is democracy possible?

with keynote by Jodi Dean. Watch the keynote session of "Is democracy possible"

A one-day symposium on the future of democracy, and media’s  contribution to that future organised by SAGE and Goldsmiths' Centre for the study of Global Media and Democracy.

Thursday 9 December 2010, 1030-1900, The British Academy, 10 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH.

In 2006 legal philosopher Ronald Dworkin asked ‘is democracy possible here?’, meaning the USA. Four years later in an era of financial crisis and partial challenges to neoliberal orthodoxy, a broader question needs to be asked about the possibilities and conditions for democracy anywhere now. What is the role of media institutions in sustaining democracy? What implications for democracy does the intensification of market pressures in the media sector have for democratic politics?

SAGE, one of the world’s leading social science publishers, and Goldsmiths’ Centre for the study of Global Media and Democracy bring together international and national experts to reflect on these questions. Renowned and controversial US political theorist Jodi Dean (author of Democracy and Other Neoliberal Fantasies Duke UP 2009 and Blog Theory Polity 2010) will give a keynote lecture.

Other speakers include David Babbs (executive director of 38degrees), Jayson Harsin (American University of Paris), Dan Hind (author of The Return of the Public) Thomas Meyer (author of Media Democracy and editor in chief of Neue Gesellschaft / Frankfurter Hefte).

The event is part of a series of celebrations for SAGE’s 45th anniversary year, championing the value and relevance of social science research.

To register, please write by Friday 19 November 2010 to Catherine Layton, SAGE, catherine.layton (@sagepub.co.uk).

For inquiries about the venue please contact Joanna Demianczuk, British Academy, j.demianczuk (@britac.ac.uk).

For general enquiries please contact Sebastian Kubitschko, Goldsmiths, s.kubitschko (@gold.ac.uk) .

Full programme follows

1030-1100 Registration, tea/coffee

Welcome

Nick Couldry, Director, Goldsmiths Global Media and Democracy Centre

Stephen Barr, Managing Editor, SAGE

1100-1230 Session One: Media as Democracy

Jayson Harsin, American University of Paris

Aeron Davis, Goldsmiths, University of London

Thomas Meyer, formerly Professor of Political Science Dortmund University and editor-in-chief, Frankfurter Hefte/Neue Gesellschaft

Chair: Natalie Fenton, Goldsmiths

1230-1400 Lunch break – Lunch is not provided.

Tea/coffee available at BA.

1400-1530 Session Two: Media for Democracy

Natalie Fenton, Goldsmiths, University of London

David Babbs, executive director of 38 Degrees

Dan Hind, author of The Return of the Public

Chair: Des Freedman, Goldsmiths

1530-1600 Tea/coffee/cakes

1600-1800 Session Three: Democratizing Democracy

Keynote speech and discussion

Jodi Dean, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, USA and Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Respondents:

Hilary Wainwright, editor of Red Pepper

Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths, University of London

Chair: James Curran, Goldsmiths

Drinks reception

In 2006 legal philosopher Ronald Dworkin asked ‘is democracy possible  here?’, meaning the USA. Four years later in an era of financial  crisis and partial challenges to neoliberal orthodoxy, a broader  question needs to be asked about the possibilities and conditions for  democracy anywhere now. What is the role of media institutions in  sustaining democracy? What implications for democracy does the  intensification of market pressures in the media sector have for  democratic politics?
SAGE, one of the world’s leading social science publishers, and  Goldsmiths’ Centre for the study of Global Media and Democracy bring  together international and national experts to reflect on these  questions. Renowned and controversial US political theorist Jodi Dean  (author of Democracy and Other Neoliberal Fantasies Duke UP 2009 and  Blog Theory Polity 2010) will give a keynote lecture.
Other speakers include David Babbs (executive director of 38degrees),  Jayson Harsin (American University of Paris), Dan Hind (author of The  Return of the Public) Thomas Meyer (author of Media Democracy and  editor in chief of Neue Gesellschaft / Frankfurter Hefte). , , and.
The event is part of a series of celebrations for SAGE’s 45th  anniversary year, championing the value and relevance of social  science research.
This is a free event
To register, please write by Friday 19 November 2010 to Catherine  Layton, SAGE, catherine.layton@sagepub.co.uk.
For inquiries about the venue please contact Joanna Demianczuk,  British Academy, j.demiaczuk@britac.ac.uk.
For general enquiries please contact Sebastian Kubitschko, Goldsmiths, s.kubitschko@gold.ac.uk  .
Full programme follows:
1030-1100 Registration, tea/coffee
Welcome
Nick Couldry, Director, Goldsmiths Global Media and Democracy Centre  Stephen Barr, Managing Editor, SAGE
1100-1230 Session One: Media as  Democracy
Jayson Harsin, American University of Paris
Aeron Davis, Goldsmiths, University of London
Thomas Meyer, formerly Professor of Political Science Dortmund  University and editor-in-chief, Frankfurter Hefte/Neue Gesellschaft
Chair: Natalie Fenton, Goldsmiths
1230-1400 Lunch break – PLEASE NOTE  LUNCH IS NOT PROVIDED.
Tea/coffee available at BA.
1400-1530 Session Two: Media for  Democracy
Natalie Fenton, Goldsmiths, University of London
David Babbs, executive director of 38 Degrees
Dan Hind, author of The Return of the Public
Chair: Des Freedman, Goldsmiths
1530-1600 Tea/coffee/cakes
1600-1800 Session Three: Democratizing  Democracy
Keynote speech and discussion
Jodi Dean, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, USA and Erasmus  University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Respondents: to be announced.
Chair: James Curran, Goldsmiths
Drinks reception
 

The Start Of New Event Series: Is Democracy Possible – Here In The UK?

May 13 Post-Election Reflections

Reflections on what the recent UK election tells us about the health, or otherwise, of democracy in the UK with:

  • Firoze Manji, Editor in Chief, Pambazuka News & Pambazuka Press
  • Colin Leys (Goldsmiths and Queens University, Ontario, author of Market-Driven Politics, 2000)
  • Hilary Wainwright, editor Red Pepper
  • Heather Wakefield, UNISON
  • Chaired by Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths'

530pm Goldsmiths main building RHB 309

Audio recording of The Start of New Event Series

May 20 Democratic Futures? Democracy beyond the UK
Debate on alternative reference-points for democratic change, from Latin America, Europe and elsewhere with:

  • Jeremy Gilbert (UEL, author of Anticapitalism and Culture, 2009)
  • Paol o Gerbaudo (Goldsmiths)
  • Alice Mattoni (European University Institute, Florence)
  • Samuel Toledano (International Visiting Fellow, Goldsmiths)

530pm Goldsmiths main building RHB 309

Audio recording of Democratic Futures

 

Part III of Capitalism Culture Critique series

Thursday 29 April 2010, 5-7pm, RHB 309, Goldsmiths [note change of room]

Capitalism, Culture, Critique
Professor Luc Boltanski, École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris
Professor Nancy Fraser, New School for Social Research, New York

Contact Kate Nash k.nash(@gold.ac.uk)

Audio recording of Part III of Capitalism Culture Critique

 

Democracy Without Journalists- The Crisis in Local News

A pre-election meeting in Parliament to highlight local journalism and democracy

Wednesday 17 March 2010, 2-4pm, Thatcher Room, Portcullis House, Westminster, Bridge Street, London. SW1P 3JA.


Speakers include: Jeremy Dear (General Secretary of the NUJ); Steve Hewlett (R4 The Media Show and Guardian columnist), Professor James Curran, (Director of Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre), Natalie Fenton (editor of New Media, Old News), Angela Phillips (founder, East London Lines), Professor Stephen Coleman (University of Leeds).

Attendance is free but places are strictly limited. Please contact Joanna Redden cop01jr(@gold.ac.uk) to reserve a place.

 

Part II of Capitalism, Culture, Critique Series

Thursday 25 February 2010, 5.30-7pm, Richard Hoggart Building, Room 309, Goldsmiths

Media and civic agency: critical cultural connections
Professor Peter Dahlgren, University of Lund, Sweden

Peter Dahlgren is internationally acknowledged as one of the leading analysts and commentators on media's role in democratic politics and the public sphere. He is Professor of Media and Communication Studies at Lund University, Sweden and has taught at Queens College and Fordham University in New York City, as well as being a visiting scholar at many universities, including the Annenberg School of Communication, University of Pennsylvania and Université de Paris II. He is the author of many books, including Television and the Public Sphere (Sage 1995) and most recently Media and Political Engagement: Citizens, Communication and Democracy (Cambridge University Press 2009).

 

EVA ILLOUZ Recognition and Its Discontents: Love and Modernity

4 February 2010, 5.30-7pm, Richard Hoggart building (Main Building) room 309

Eva Illouz is Professor of Sociology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a member of the Center for the Study of Rationality. She delivered the Adorno Lectures at the Institute for Social Research in Frankfurt in 2005 and has held visiting positions at Princeton University, Northwestern University, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris) and the Institute for Advanced Thought (Berlin). Her books include Oprah Winfrey and the Glamor of Misery (Chicago University Press 2003), Cold Intimacies: the Making of Emotional Capitalism (Polity 2007) and Saving the Modern Soul (University of California Press 2008).

 

Mapping Digital Media

Des Freedman and Justin Schlosberg publish report with the Open Society Foundation.

With access to broadband and the internet steadily rising towards saturation levels the UK will complete the transition to digital broadcasting in 2012. While this transition will be completed under budget and without major setbacks, Des Freedman and Justin Schlosberg point out in their report ‘Mapping Digital Media’ that it is by no means clear that citizens and society at large will benefit from the digital transition.

The spread of the internet and digital media tends to undermine the media structures that have served the UK well for the past half century. Not only the newspapers are in a crisis with quality newspapers experiencing a 25 percent decline in circulation between 2005 and 2010. But also the BBC, according to the authors, ‘has found itself increasingly caught in a vice’ as it aims to achieve sufficient audience while it simultaneously has to provide the merit goods.

Due to the scale of the crisis, Freedman and Schlosberg recommend a full-scale media commission into the state of the news media, and new forms of support for public service in the media. As it appears unlikely that the market will address these severe issues, the authors suggest that it is the government who needs to ensure that the public interest is not eclipsed as the media ecology of a digital Britain beds down.

Read the full report.