Current PhD students

Article

Here are some profiles of our current PhD students.

Assiya Amini

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Experiences of Loss in the Afghan Diaspora Community in London: Representing the Lost and Missing Narratives in Search for Peace

Alexandra Anikina

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Cyborg Cinema and the Technologies of Estrangement

Oylun Apak

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Meta-activists of the Gezi Movement: A Study on the Cyber-evolved Activist

Rabea Berfelde

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

In the Urban Factory. The Spatialisation of Human Capital

My research departs from the thesis of immaterial labour, as put forward by the post-workerist school of thought, that since the 1970s the hegemonic labour process ceases to be Factory-based production of material goods and becomes primarily linguistic, cognitive in nature and ultimately guided towards the production of cultural and social life itself. Taking on the assumption that labour always had a spatio-temporal organization that expressed itself in the urban built environment, it will be asked how contemporary forms of productive cooperation are organized in and through urban space.

By focusing on workers located in large-scale co-working spaces in Berlin’s district of Kreuzberg as well as individuals that decide to sublet furnished rooms and flats via platforms such as Airbnb and Wunderflats, I will ask how the work-place might be re-configured as a place for reproduction and affective labour and the home as the side for work i.e. production. Further, it will be analysed how the social relations of the work-places spill out into the urban environment they are located within and how the urban environment becomes complicit in the production of a particular entrepreneurial worker’s subjectivity.

Considering, that the neoliberalization of the social welfare-state and the financialization of the economy with its intimate link to real-estate-speculation are equally taking place since the 1970s, it will be analysed how different groups of urban dwellers navigate these experiences of everyday life’s precarization- caused by the dismantling of welfare-state provision such as job securities and infrastructures of care and reproduction such as public and social housing provision.

Rabea is supervised by Dr. Marina Vishmidt and Dr. Louis Moreno.

She obtained a BA in Political Science at Freie Universität Berlin (as well as Universidad Complutense de Madrid and Sciences Po Paris) and holds an MA in Cultural Studies from Goldsmiths College. Her MPhil/PHD-research is currently funded by the Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes. In 2018/19 she taught the seminar [GEND] Introduction to the Theories of Biopolitics at the research unit for political theory and philosophy at Freie Universität Berlin.

Mary Braid

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Changing Representations of Adoption in the News Media Since the 1960s

Ilya Brookwell

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

From Gamer to Citizen: Live Video Politics in a Digital Age

Silvia Carrasco

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Mind the gap: the lack of alignment between the way news are produced and how they are consumed by mobile audiences

Hong Chen

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Transnational Families and Digital Technologies: Parenting at a Distance Among Chinese Families

Thomas Chivers

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Media power, stakeholder pressure and the formation of media policy: A critical analysis of media policymaking in the United Kingdom

Morganne Conti

PhD Students
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Affective Ambivilance & the Construction of Subjectivity in Women Artists' Narratives

Ben Craggs

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Creating Life and Taking Lives: Identifying the Bios in Bioart

My thesis will examine the emergence of new media practice that works at the borders of both art and science. The transitory field of bio art has many definitions and encompasses different practices ranging from the application of computer technology to the manipulation of genetic code and cell structures.

The common root, however, is their interaction with new biosciences, particularly biotechnology and the developments that take life or living matter and manipulate it through technical intervention. The intention of this research is to question the role both art and science practice play in constructing political and philosophical concepts that become identified as 'life'. Vehemently opposed to positioning art, science or the humanities hierarchically in terms of 'value' I am interested in understanding how knowledge is mediated, how it gains cultural, social and political value in order to facilitate a more nuanced understanding of the stories we tell about ourselves, about ‘the Other’ and about the 'world'.

Ben holds a Bachelors degree in Contemporary Media Practice from the University of Westminster where he specialised in Software Design as Art Practice and a Masters Degree in Digital Media from Goldsmiths College.

Natalie Dixon

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Mobile Story: A Travelling Cultural Romance

In my dissertation I investigate the affective connection between people and mobile phones, a connection I articulate as kinship, romance and other more ambiguous attachments. This connection implicates bodies – both animate and inanimate ones. As I argue, these bodies are not bounded, isolated ‘things’ but are rather part of ongoing processes of communication and information exchange. 

Drawing on my experiences as a career journalist I employ writing – as both my method of investigation and an embodied practice. Therefore, my writing is not only a way to list and describe experiences and feelings but also to perform them. 

I argue that part of my strategic role and critical reflexivity as a writer is to recognize the history of our human-mobile relationship. This affective narrative is, therefore, a fashioned response - a re-storying - of the already taken-for-granted stories told about the technology. In so doing, I  avoid reducing mobiles to objects for analytical study somehow exempt from the context, culture and history that produced them.    

Supervised by Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska

Please find more information on my website: nataliedixon.info

 

Xiang Fan

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Chinese Cinephilia and Film Online Communities

Chandra Frank

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Can the Archive Speak? Black and Brown Feminist/Queer Genealogies and the Politics of Pleasure

Neda Genova

PhD Student
n.genova (@gold.ac.uk)

Surfaces of Post-Communism

Annie Goh

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

A Genealogy of Sonic Knowledge

Judy Harris

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

The Wind in the Burlap Trees - Utopianism and the pro-filmic world in the work of Vachel Lindsay

The thesis examines the role of cinema in Vachel Lindsay’s utopian project, exploring its two main functions – the restoration of a 'hieroglyphic' folk-imagination in the American subject and the capacity of the pro filmic world to reveal the constructed and contingent nature of American society. I will consider the utopian implications of films which create stylised fictional worlds which foreground their ‘madeness’ and which Lindsay assumes can illuminate the madeness or contingency of social reality. I identify a marginalised filmic practice which I conceptualise as 'capricious cinema' which employs a range of representational styles or aesthetic techniques which do not easily cohere. These themes will be explored with reference to the work of D.W. Griffith, Maurice Tourneur, Karel Zeman and Wes Anderson amongst others. 

Publications

Peer-reviewed

Harris, J.    ‘Can the Subaltern Teach?’, Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies (Feb 2015)

David Heinemann

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

The Voice Fantasmatic: The Role Of Speech in the Cinematic Representation of Psychosis

Sandra Kazlauskaite

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

The Embodiment of Sound in Contemporary Audiovisual Art Gallery Spaces

Michael Klontzas

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Technology public policy as public service objective: The changing role of the BBC

Niels Ladefoged

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

The Narratives of Whistleblowing: Empowering Whistleblowers Through Participatory Action Research

Sasha Litvintseva

PhD Students
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Geological Filmmaking

In recent years, media studies has developed theoretical models which consider the material aspects of media technologies. In the context of the widespread ecological crisis, such studies have included analyses of media as products of the extraction of geological materials. My doctoral project of ‘geological filmmaking’ contributes to this growing set of discourses by experimenting, on a conceptual and artistic level, with the reciprocal relations between geology and film. Building on existing theoretical studies of the geological materiality of the filmic medium, it explores formal and temporal intersections between film and geology in order to engage with some of the representational challenges posed by the ecological crisis. ‘The geological’ here acts as a perceptual and cognitive extremity of the human (in)ability to grasp processes unfolding across vast spatio-temporal scales. Through an integrated theory-practice methodology my project takes two specific geological phenomena as prisms through which to explore the greater philosophical problems encountered at the intersections of human and geological timescales. In the process of making two films – one focused on sinkholes, the other on asbestos – the geological has revealed itself to be inextricably tied to socio-economic processes. It has thus become an urgent demand, requiring a response here and now. This study is an attempt to offer such a response. By reading film and geology through each other, I have staged an encounter between the moments in which their reciprocity illuminates key issues surrounding the anthropogenic ecological crisis, both in its vastness and proximity, its longevity and immediacy. I have also taken some steps towards outlining an artistic methodology for engaging with planetary ecological issues via the medium of film.

Sasha Litvintseva is supervised by Joanna Zylinska and Rachel Moore.

Sasha Litvintseva is an artist, filmmaker and writer.

Sasha Litvintseva's website

Vince Medeiros

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

The Hypercommercialisation of Youth Media: Conflict, Agency & Models in a Post-Advertising World

Chantal Meng

PhD Students
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

LIGHT AT NIGHT: What is the matter of/with darkness?

This thesis explores borders between mediated and unmediated nightscapes, and performs analysis of ecologies of perception and cognition, calling into question a simple distinction between darkness as “unmediated” and light as “mediated” space. The aim is to gain new ways of reading the city night image and to tackle influences between built and “natural” environments within visual investigations.

https://www.nightdrawing.com
https://www.chantalmeng.com

Emilia Moisio

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Imagining reality: scientific imagery in the construction of perceptions of reality

Roberto Mozzachiodi

PhD Student
r.mozzachiodi (@gold.ac.uk)

The death of philosophy in Marx; Henri Lefebvre, Louis Althusser and Jacques Derrida.

The arc traced by Marx’s trajectory from philosophy to politics by way of an avowed break from the protocols of classical German philosophy has been a major stumbling block for many if not all thinkers and activists working within a Marxist framework. Deprived of that definitive theory of dialectical knowledge that would replace philosophy which Marx had intended on writing, Marxists in his wake have gleaned from his writing particular configurations of the relationship between theory and practice or conceptual thought and political action to varying ends. Significant in this respect is the heritage of reception surrounding the well-known passage from the 11th Thesis on Feuerbach in the German Ideology; “Philosophers have hitherto only interpreted the world in various ways; the point is to change it.” The hardening of boundaries designating certain kinds of activity as properly political (i.e. transformative) and certain types of intellectual activity as properly non-ideological (or sufficiently non-philosophical) can be rooted in an indeterminacy prevailing in Marx’s injunction for a death of philosophy.
 
From this perspective, three variously politicized philosophers living under the practical outcomes of this indeterminacy attempted to reconfigure these hardened boundaries in distinct but overlapping historical and institutional contexts; namely their distinct proximities to the French Communist Party. These philosophers were Henri Lefebvre, Louis Althusser and Jacques Derrida. During the second half of the twentieth century, at particular moments of crisis for the Marxist political and intellectual project in the French context, these three figures engaged in vastly different and sometimes complimentary political and theoretical projects consisting in an attempt to reconfigure the philosophy/politics dyad in Marx. They did so with wavering fidelity to the idea of the primacy of practice over theory. This project historically situates these different intellectual and activist projects and draws into relief the specific institutional contexts and philosophical resources which gave shape to their different articulation and engagement with the death of philosophy problematic in Marx.

Nada Mubarak

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Rebalancing Media Power: Themes of freedom of expression in Saudi online media

Michelle Ohnona

PhD Students
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Narrative, Identity and Memory: Exploring Representations of Nation

Christine Osei

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Black Star Rising: Exploring the Influence of Digital Activism on Contemporary Feminist Solidarity Movements in Urban, Accra, Ghana

Edwina Peart

PhD Students
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Musicking, the Voice & Listening Explored Through the Work of Reggae Artist Gregory Isaacs

Nikolaus Perneczky

PhD Students
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Negative Ecologies of Third Cinema

Adrian C. Hillman

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Boardroom to Newsroom: How Corporate Decisions are Limiting the Flow of Political Communication

Shira Pinczuk

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Crossing the Live: The Concept of Border in Realistic Documentary Film-making

Anita Purcell-Sjolund

PhD Students
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

In the Wake of Captain Cook: (Re-)Imaging the Native in Ethnotainment Programmes of Pacific Tribes

Ariana Robey-Lawrence

PhD Student
medis-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Shaking Habits: Exploring feminist strategies of production, positioning, coalition, agency, and creative praxes among „Otherized“ contemporary electronic musicians, producers, and DJs

Aaron Santry

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Art after Control: Digitality and/as Resistance in Artists' Moving Image

Antje Scharenberg

PhD Student
medis-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

“Pro-European activism in (times of) crisis” - Investigating the mediated subjectivities, practices & politics of contemporary pro-European activism

Dervla Shannahan

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Ziyarat Practices in Contemporary Iraq & Inclusivity in Muslim Ritual Practices

Current research interests include ziyarat practices in contemporary Iraq and inclusivity in Muslim ritual practices. Psychotherapist and confounder of the Inclusive Mosque Initiative.
 

Select journal publications

  • ‘I love you more: an embodied account of performing ziyarat in Iraq’, Performing Islam, forthcoming 2014.
  • Gender, inclusivity and UK mosque experiences ,’ Contemporary Islam 8 (1) 2014, 1-16.
  • 'Heather has two mommies and they're both caucasian and moneyed: Unsaids in international queer children's literature,'Darkmatter Journal, September 2010.
  • 'Some Queer Questions from a Muslim faith perspective,' Journal of Sexualities, 2010, 13 (6) 671-684.
  • 'Rap on 'l' Avenue'; reflections on Islam, Masculinities, and the public sphere in the Tunisian Rap scene,' (Co-authored with Qurra-Tul-Anne Hussain), Journal of Contemporary Islam, 2010, 5 (1) 37-58
  • ‘Sexual ethics, marriage, and sexual autonomy,' Journal of Contemporary Islam, 2009, 3 (1) 59-78.

Select book chapters

  • ‘Rap on l’avenue,’ (with Hussain, Q), in The Hip Hop and Religion Reader, eds. Pinn, A., and Miller, M., Routledge: New York., forthcoming 2014. 
  • ‘Gender, sexuality and inclusivity in UK mosques’ in Marranci, G., Islam in practice, Routledge Studying Religions in Practice series, Routledge: London, 2014, 124-134. 
  • ‘Textual Queering and filmatic interventions: Contesting Islam as heteronormative inheritance,' The Ashgate Research Companion to Sexuality and Religion, (Edited by Andrew Yip), 2012. 
 

Chen-Ta Sung

PhD Student
csung001 (@gold.ac.uk)

Friendship Practices and Social Media: A Taiwanese Perspective

in the module of culture and cultural studies (2016/2017) at Goldsmiths, University of London. Before joining Goldsmiths, he has obtained academic degrees at the London School of Economics and Political Science (UK), King’s College London (UK), and National Taiwan University of Arts (Taiwan), with the disciplines of media and communications, digital culture and sociology, and social psychology methodology. In the mean time, Chen-Ta works as a part-time survey researcher at Euromoney Instituitional Investor.

Chen-Ta’s academic interests locate in the fields of computer-mediated communications, social relationships in the digital age, social psychology of mass media and new media, and social and cultural implications of social media use.

Chen-Ta’s PhD thesis is under supervision by Dr. Mirca Madianou. The project is entitled as ‘Friendships and Social Media: A Taiwanese Perspective’. He argues that the notion of friendships in Taiwan is interwoven with Confucianism and social consequences of guanxi principles. The aim of his PhD project is to explore how these friendship values unfold in an integrated digital environment shaped by affordances of diverse digital media.

Rather than viewing online friendship practices as a global fashion with universal meanings, this study argues that the emerging practices of friendships are a process shaped by the interaction between features of complexity and uncertainty in the digital environment and embodiments of local values of friendships.

Anyone interested in the topics depicted, please contact on Email.

Madaleine Grace Tillyard

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Gender, healing and health networks in the Caribbean: The Postcolonial Feminist Politics of Women's Health Online and Offline

Pentti Turunen

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Mekatilili - Activist media in support of traditional and indigenous knowledge

Lennaart Van Oldenborgh

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

The Raw and the Cut: Editing as a Form of Selective Forgetting

Sabrina Wilkinson

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Networks and gatekeepers: The politics of internet policy in Canada

James Williamson

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

The Mythology of the Bomb: Science Fiction Film & Theories of Meaning & Communication in the Early Cold War Period

Lana Wrightman

PhD Student
media-comms (@gold.ac.uk)

Political Economies of PBS in the Digital Era: The Future of American Public Television