Course dates

Starting date, Thursday 3 Oct 2019
6.30-8.30pm | 10 weeks
Starting date, Thursday 16 Jan 2020
6.30-8.30pm | 10 weeks

Course overview

An anthropological, cross-cultural understanding of visual and material cultures is crucial to anyone that works in the creative industries, such as those in curatorial roles. Explore the convergances between art and anthropology, and develop your understanding of non-Western artistic cultures, placing them in their proper cultural, historical and socio-economic contexts. This course will enable you to contextualise implicit value systems, challenging Western style models and aesthetics.

I absolutely loved this course! Max presented these fascinating lectures in an engaging and inspiring way. I now have an up to date insight into the world of Anthropology and Art History and how they overlap and affect museums, curation and the world of auctions and collectors. I will miss these lectures when the course ends, and want to book another short course. I am recommending this course to friends, it really has been a life-changing, eye-opening and enlightening experience.

Natalie, Interior Designer, Spring 2018

The course tutor, Max, was fantastic and passionate and shared his knowledge generously and furthermore and importantly - made us as students ask questions that we'd never thought about. Thanks you very much!

Participant, Spring 2018

This course is ideal for you if you are working or studying in fields related to the arts, anthropology, design, photography, film and museums, or even if you've a keen interest in any of these areas and would like to find out more. Hosted by our Department of Anthropology, this course will challenge conventional Western value systems, placing them in a wider context underpinned by the latest theories in the field of anthropology. In challenging the hierarchy of the Western tradition, we'll explore artistic cultures as diverse as Islamic, Precolumbian, Tribal, Chinese, Indian, African and others beyond European boundaries. We'll develop your critical and analytical tools, drawing on the vast discourse of anthropology of art studies, enabling you to evaluate objects and visual expressions using a cross-cultural comparative framework. The understanding of artistic cultures in an anthropological context feeds into a wide range of professional areas. These include, but are not limited to, artists, artisans, craft practitioners, tour guides, art gallery personnel, journalists, auctioneers, art consultants, museum volunteers, as well as those looking to enter these fields, or to use this course in your ongoing professional development.

Why study this course?

  • Gain an understanding of the multiple intersections between local and global realities related to art, its markets, and the visual regimes operating in both the past and present across the world
  • Develop your understanding of the theories, arguments and methods used in anthropological study
  • Develop your critical eye and analytical refinement, enabling you to speak confidently about anthropology and art
  • Explore and challenge perceived Western value systems, by engaging in practical and theoretical debates surrounding non-Western artistic cultural practice
  • Learn how to apply these frameworks into your everyday life, be it in a personal, professional or artistic context

Fees

£295

Booking information

Disability Support

We are committed to providing reasonable teaching adjustments for students with disabilities that may impact on their learning experience. Please be advised that in order to provide an assessment and plan appropriate support we require as much notice as possible and, in some circumstances, up to 3 months. If you are planning to book, or have already booked, onto a short course please contact Goldsmiths Disability Team (disability@gold.ac.uk) at your earliest convenience.

Please note that our short courses sell-out quickly, so early booking is advisable. 

Starting date, Thursday 3 Oct 2019
6.30-8.30pm | 10 weeks
Starting date, Thursday 16 Jan 2020
6.30-8.30pm | 10 weeks

Enquiries

If you have any questions about this course please contact shortcourses (@gold.ac.uk) .

For information on our upcoming short courses please sign up to our mailing list.

Location

Richard Hoggart Building

Tutor information


N/A

Dr. Max Carocci, MA, PhD (Adjunct Lecturer Museum and Curating MA) Chelsea College of Art, University of the Arts, London, and lecturer in World Arts (American University in London), is an anthropologist based in London. Former curator at the British Museum, he is at present advisor and consultant for auction houses (e.g. Bonhams), academic institutions (e.g. Royal Academy), galleries, and museums across the country and abroad (The Netherlands, Germany, UK, Switzerland, France, USA).

Max recently curated an exhibition on contemporary Native American art for the Venice Biennale (Volume 0 – Two Native Artists and Venice’s Renaissance, 2019). His previous curatorial work includes collaborations with Native North American artists for the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt (The Common Thread), the Missoula Art Museum, USA, and the Hardesty Art Centre, USA.

 Last year he organization the international conference on Art and Anthropology (British Museum/Royal Anthropological Institute/SOAS; June 2018), and sits on the Royal anthropological Institute’s advisory board of the committee on Anthropology of Art. Max’s on-going research on themes of indigeneity, art, and anthropology continues on the lines of his first book Warriors of the Plains (McGill University Press/British Museum Press, 2012). Research-active, Max is currently working on two new books on Native Americans in art with Sioux Dakota art historian and co-author Dr. Stephanie Pratt.

 

Course structure

Week 1 – Introducing Art and Anthropology

The historically distinct disciplines of art history and anthropology have developed their theories and methods in separate geographical areas: Europe and countries under the European influence, and the rest of the world respectively. Although anthropology brought to the attention of the academic community examples from different cultures, art history has been slow in embracing the study of arts from most parts of the world. In this session, we look at the historical trajectories that turned art history and anthropology to opposite directions as a way to examine the emergence of large theoretical and methodological gaps that have rendered the discussion of most world regions’ arts marginal to the cross-cultural study of artefacts, and aesthetics in most Western academic circles outside anthropology.

Questions:

1. How do art history and anthropology differ?

2. What are the scopes and aims of the two disciplines?

3. What questions will each of the two disciplines ask?

4. Why did anthropology mostly focus on non-Western cultures?

5. To what extent is art history only concerned with European and European-influenced cultures?

Suggested reading:

· Svašek, Maruška 2007 Anthropology, Art and Cultural Production London: Pluto

· Morphy, Howard and Morgan Perkins (eds) 2006 The Anthropology of Art: a Reader London: Blackwell

· Westerman, Mariët (Ed.) 2005 Anthropologies of Art New Haven: Yale University Press

· Summers, David 2003 Real Spaces: World Art History and the Rise of Western Modernism London: Phaidon

Articles/Chapters/Essays:

· Morphy, Howard and Morgan Perkins 2006 ‘The Anthropology of Art: a Reflection on its History and Contemporary Practice’ in M. Morphy and M. Perkins The Anthropology of Art: a Reader London: Blackwell

· Phillips, Ruth B. 2005 ‘The Value of Disciplinary Difference: Reflections on Art History and Anthropology at the Beginning of the Twenty-First Century’ in M. Westermann (Ed.) Anthropologies of Art New Haven: Yale University Press

· Goldwater, Robert 1973 ‘Art History and Anthropology: Some Comparisons of Methodology’ in A. Forge (Ed.) Primitive Art and Society London: Oxford University Press

Week 2 - Non-Western Artefacts in the West

Cultures have been in contact for millennia and objects exchanged hands since antiquity through trade, curiosity, and anthropological research. In this brief excursus of West’s multiple engagements with non-Western artefacts, we uncover the impact they had on the European imagination, from Renaissance cabinets of curiosity to Picasso and the Surrealists’ collecting of African and ‘tribal’ arts. A short history of the birth and differentiation of various types of museums will contextualise the ways in which European discourses on non-Western arts have been constructed on ideas of cultural difference (ethnographic arts), primitivism (prehistoric and tribal arts), exoticism (tourist arts), and orientalism (decorative and applied arts from eastern countries) to analyse how even today, art beyond the West is perceived and valued according to these standards. Between week 2 and week 3 students will be asked to visit a museum in anticipation of a class discussion in week 3 (e.g. Horniman Museum, British Museum, Wellcome collections London, Oxford Pitt Rivers, Cambridge Museum of Anthropology, Ashmolean, Brighton Pavillion, etc.).

Questions:

1. How have ideas of primitivism, orientalism, exoticism and cultural difference impacted European understandings of non-Western artefacts?

2. To what extent can we link the idea of collecting with Europe’s colonial past?

3. When did the notion of the ‘primitive’ emerge and why?

4. In what context can we talk about ‘tribal’ arts?

5. What is the status of ‘oriental’ arts in the Western imagination?

Suggested reading:

· Price, Sally 2001 Primitive Art in Civilized Places Chicago: University of Chicago Press

· Rhodes, Colin 1994 Primitivism and Modern Art London: Thames and Hudson

· Hiller, Susan (Ed.) 1991 The Myth of Primitivism: Perspectives on Art London: Routledge

· Mauries, Patrick 2002 Cabinets of Curiosities London: Thames and Hudson

Articles/Chapters/Essays:

· Syson, Luke 2003 ‘The Ordering of the Artificial World: Collecting, Classification and Progress’ in K. Sloan (Ed.) Enlightenment: Discovering the World in the Eighteenth Century London: British Museum Press

· Clunas, Craig 1997 ‘Oriental Antiquities/Far Eastern Art’ in T. Barlow (Ed.) Formations of Colonial Modernity in East Asia Durham: Duke University Press

· Blocker, Gene H. 1994 ‘Is Primitive Art Art?’ in The Aesthetics of Primitive Art New York: Lanham

Week 3 – Ethnographic Artefacts versus Art

Anthropology’s interest in cultural diversity is behind the creation of large collections of artefacts from all the world regions. Often these objects are stored and displayed in museums specifically build for them in the 19th c. Items gathered in ethnographic collections stand in stark contrast with art pieces that epitomise national heritages. With this lecture we aim at highlighting the subtle differences there are between folk traditions, cultural heritage, ethnographic objects, national collections, and high arts. These classifications will be juxtaposed to make sense of the contextual perceptions associated with diverse cultural productions from different parts of the world. We will specifically focus on the art-artefact nexus that still polarises popular perceptions and representations circulating in various places.

Questions:

1. How has the division between art and artefact been used in Western institutional discourse?

2. What is the status of artefacts in places where they are presented as ‘folk’ culture?

3. What are the differences between folk and ethnographic arts?

4. To what extent can contemporary non-Western arts be considered ‘ethnographic’?

5. What are the implications for dividing high art from ethnographic and folk art?

Suggested reading:

· Burt, Ben 2013 World Art: an Introduction to the Art in Artefacts London: Bloomsbury

· Errington, Shelley 1998 The Death of Authentic Primitive Art and Other Tales of Progress Berkeley: University of California Press

· Coote, Jeremy and Anthony Shelton (eds) 1992 Anthropology, Art and Aesthetics London: Clarendon Press

· Graburn, Nelson (Ed.) 1976 Ethnic and Tourist Arts: Cultural Expressions from the Fourth World Berkeley: University of California Press

 

Articles/Chapters/Essays:

· Guss, David M. 1989 ‘All Things Made’ from To Weave and to Sing: Art, Symbol and Narrative in the South American Rainforest Berkeley: University of California Press

· Gell, Alfred 1996 ‘Vogel’s Net: Traps as Artworks and Artworks as Traps’ Journal of Material Culture 1(1): 15-38

· Danto, Arthur C. 1989 ‘Artifact and Art’ pp. 18-32 in Art/Artifact New York: Center for African Art

Week 4 - Form and Function

An anthropological study of art does not simply mean introducing non-Western arts in the comparative analysis of objects with aesthetic value, it is a more complex exercise that questions what counts as art, one that analyses whether or not what we can usually call ‘art’ practices (painting, sculpture, performance etc.) can be applicable to objects and experiences that in contexts outside the West may not be classified as such. Here we address how at the beginning anthropology began to study art produced in areas outside Europe, progressively moving away from formal analyses of objects and diffusion of ideas (Boas) to study their function from the vantage point of social structure (Sieber). Here we examine the limitations and advantages of using diffusionist and structural-functionalist ideas in the study of art developed in early anthropology.

Questions:

1. How far can a study of form and function take an anthropological analysis of artefacts?

2. What are the limitations and benefits of using a diffusionist framework for an understanding of artistic changes?

3. What was Boas’s most ground-breaking contribution to the study of non-Western arts?

4. What is anthropology’s aim in studying non-Western arts if its object is not limited to studying aesthetics?

5. How do we deal with artefacts that appear to be ‘art’ in places where there is no such concept?

Suggested reading:

· Boas, Franz 1955 Primitive Art London: Dover

· Sieber, Roy 1987 African Art in the Cycle of Life Washington: Smithsonian Books

Articles/Chapters/Essays:

· Boas, Franz 1955 [1927] ‘Graphic and Plastic Arts: the Formal Element in Art’ in Primitive Art New York: Dover

· Forge, Anthony 1973 ‘Style and Meaning in Sepik Art’ in A. Forge (Ed.) Primitive Art and Society London: Oxford University Press

Week 5 – Structures and Symbols

Developments within anthropology shifted the attention from the function of objects to their inherent communicative potential. Art began to be interpreted as a symbolic language (Levi Strauss), then as text (Geertz), until anthropologists started looking at the materiality of objects to develop new theories (Miller). In this latter phase objects and humans were discussed as mutually constituted through practice. This new perspective was further developed into the notion of the agency of objects (Gell), which became extremely influential in new shifts towards anthropological theories of art. Agency theory eventually led to a new interest in local ideas about the active role of things, and how they are frequently thought to be alive. This lesson looks at the implications for direct applications of these theories to a study of artefacts worldwide.

Questions:

1. What was Levi-Strauss’s contribution to art history, and the study of art in anthropology?

2. Why did anthropologists after Levi-Strauss engaged with the materiality of objects?

3. Following Gell’s theory, how far can stretch the notion that objects have ‘agency’?

4. In many places artefacts embody the presence of invisible entities, what are the implications for collectors, museum professionals and gallerists?

5. How can we explain the communicative potential of objects in non-Western contexts?

Suggested reading:

· Levi-Strauss, Claude 1963 ‘Split Representation in the Art of Asia and America’ in Structural Anthropology New York: Basic Books

· Gell, Alfred 1998 Art and Agency: an Anthropological Theory London: Clarendon Press

Articles/Chapters/Essays:

· Munn, Nancy C. 1966 ‘Visual Categories: an Approach to the Study of Representational Systems’ American Anthropologist (68): 936-950

· Lagrou, Els 2009 ‘The Crystallized Memory of Artifacts: a Reflection on Agency and Alterity in Cashinahua Image-Making’ in F. Santos-Granero (Ed.) The Occult Life of Things: Native Amazonian Theories of Materiality and Personhood Tucson: University of Arizona Press

Week 6 – Authorship, Authenticity and Provenance

Art historical prerogatives and parameters have very frequently offered a template for museums, galleries and collectors. Issues of provenance, authenticity and authorship are germane to the valuation of art/ethnographic/folk objects that circulate in multiple ways through art market circuits, auction houses, and museum acquisition channels. Here we discuss the implications and consequences for framing art pieces in terms of their market value, and the impact that connoisseurship may have in establishing aesthetic standards, economic worth, and prestige for individual pieces and eventually, entire collections.

Questions:

1. How important is to determine an object’s authorship?

2. To what extent we can say that traditional cultures are unchanging?

3. What are the implications for applying aesthetic judgements to non-western artefacts?

4. How compatible are European and non-Western aesthetic systems?

5. Why do Western institutions insist on the provenance of non-Western artefacts?

Suggested reading:

· Anderson, Richard L. 1990 Calliope’s Sisters: a Comparative Study of Philosophies of Art New York: Prentice Hall

· Van der Grijp, Paul 2009 Art and Exoticism: an Anthropology of the Yearning for Authenticity Berlin: Lit Verlag

· Marquis, Alice Goldfarb 1991 The Art Biz: the Covert World of Collectors, Dealers, Auction Houses, Museums, and Critics Chicago: Contemporary Books

· Renfrew, Colin 2001 Loot, Legitimacy and Ownership London: Duckworth

Articles/Chapters/Essays:

· Satov, Murray 1997 ‘Catalogues, Collectors, Curators: the Tribal Art Market and Anthropology’ in J. McClancy (Ed.) Contesting Art: Art Politics and Identity in the Modern World Oxford: Berg

· Warne Monroe, John 2018 ‘The Market as “Artist”: the French Origins of the Obsession with Provenance in Historical African Art’ Critical Interventions 12(2): 52-70

Week 7 – Heritage, Inspiration, Ethics, and Cultural Appropriation

Peoples whose objects have been acquired during colonialism often consider items part of these collections as their cultural heritage. Claiming legitimacy on these items’ designs and specificity results in harsh diatribes on who has the right to produce, sell, or market art inspired by them, or that uses traditional motifs more generally. While the issue of authorship is not a universal concern, the mounting interest in these questions has generated legal and moral dilemmas for the display of non-Western objects more generally. Importantly, it has highlighted important problems related to the ethics of dispossession, the sale of art pieces from questionable sources, and representation of sensitive material (secret, religious, controversial) in museums and galleries to the larger public.

Questions:

1. ‘Ethnic’ arts are source of inspiration for designers, fashion stylists and artists, how legitimate are non-Western peoples’ accusations of cultural appropriation?

2. Inspiration and creativity are at the core of Western market’s driving forces, how ethical is the use of non-Western motifs in Western-produced merchandise?

3. On what bases have display and sale of sacred objects in museums, auctions, and galleries been criticised?

4. How can museums, galleries, collectors, and auction houses respond to the mounting criticism of being the soft arm of neo-colonial ideologies?

5. What could institutions do to integrate non-Eurocentric strategies in their practice?

Suggested reading:

· Paine, Crispin 2013 Religious Objects in Museums London: Bloomsbury

· Van der Grijp, Paul 2006 Passion and Profit: towards an Anthropology of Collecting Berlin: Lit Verlag

· Root, Deborah 1996 Cannibal Culture: Art, Appropriation, and the Commodification of Culture Boulder: Westview

· Shelton, Anthony and Brian Durrans 2001 Collectors: Individuals and Institutions London: Horniman

Articles/Chapters/Essays:

· Markus Schindlbeck 2016 ‘The (Im-)Possibilities of Exhibiting the Sacred/Secret: Discussing [Open] Secrets’ Baessler-Archiv (Neue Folge) 63: 7-34

· Haidy Geismar 2005 ‘Copyright in Context: Carvings, Carvers, and Commodities in Vanuatu’ American Ethnologist 32 (3): 437-59

Week 8 - Decolonising Art Practices and Museums

In the post-colonial era the active presence of non-Western and indigenous artists has radically reshaped the discourse and practices of art markets, museum representations, as well as collecting. Increasing pressure to relinquish colonial legacies entrenched in institutional operations of museums, art galleries, and auction houses have put in sharp focus minorities’ issues about power, notions of value, and problems of access to networks. Institutional marginalisation has prevented many artists around the world to actively engage with high-end trade markets limiting their creations to being perceived as either simple expressions of their cultures, or poor derivative copies of Western templates/models. This lesson also covers issues of repatriation and the establishment of tribal museums and indigenously-run cultural centres.

Questions:

1. What were the consequences of postcolonial independence for heritage, art, and folklore?

2. What are the differences between postcolonial states, and settler colonial states with regards to the arts and heritage?

3. How do socioeconomic differences impact non-Western artists/craftspeople access to art trade networks?

4. What place do minority, indigenous, and postcolonial arts have in the current art trade?

5. How far have galleries, auction houses, and museums engaged with postcolonial critiques?

Suggested reading:

· Brown, Alison and Laura Peers (eds) 2003 Museums and Source Communities: a Routledge Reader London: Routledge

· Sleeper-Smith, Susan (Ed) 2009 Contesting Knowledge: Museums and Indigenous Perspectives Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press

· Vrdoljak, Ana Filipa 2006 International Law, Museums, and the Return of Cultural Objects Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

· Lonetree, Amy 2012 Decolonizing Museums: Representing Native America in National and Tribal Museums Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press

Articles/Chapters/Essays:

· Stoller, Paul 2003 ‘Circuits of African Art/Paths of Wood: Exploring an Anthropological Trail’ Anthropological Quarterly 76(2): 207-34

· Tom G. Svensson 2015 ‘On Craft and Art: Some Thoughts on Repatriation and Collecting Policy - The Case of Collections at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo’ Visual Anthropology 28 (4): 324-35

Week 9 –Contemporary Worlds

Biennales, museums, and art galleries are becoming increasingly more attuned to the emergence of new voices from the peripheries of the art historical world. Starting from the

earliest attempts at creating new forums for the display and sale of non-European and indigenous arts, the lecture will cover the often contentious curatorial choices that over time have guided public perceptions of the art trade’s new ventures (investments in Aboriginal, Tribal Indian, or African arts), and the establishment of new discourses around them. This lesson will also address the most recent attempts at involving increasingly more artists in the art market by way of temporary exhibitions, and the effect of specialised galleries’ activities (e.g. expert forums, artist talks, educational lectures, round tables etc.).

Questions:

1. How can we explain the absence of indigenous, and non-Western artists in the art trade circuits?

2. What can non-Western artists contribute to the art discourse and anthropology?

3. Why would anthropology be interested in contemporary non-Western art and artists?

4. What is the role of the ethnic-contemporary art dichotomy in today’s art market?

5. How can we explain the overwhelming interest in some non-Western regional arts and the lack of attention to other areas?

Suggested reading:

· Venbrux, Eric Pamela Sheffield Rosi, and Robert L. Welsh (eds) 2006 Exploring World Art Long Grove (Illinois): Waveland Press

· Phillips, Ruth and Christopher B. Steiner (eds) 1999 Unpacking Culture: Art and Commodity in Colonial and Postcolonial Worlds Berkeley: University of California Press

· Hill, Greg, Candice Hopkins, and Christine Lalonde 2013 Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art Ottawa: National Gallery of Canada

· Thomas, Nicholas 1999 Possessions: Indigenous Art/Colonial Culture London: Thames and Hudson

Articles/Chapters/Essays:

· Shatanawi, Mirjam 2009 ‘Contemporary Art in Ethnographic Museums’ in H. Belting and A. Buddiensieg (eds) The Global Art World: Audiences, Markets & Museums Osfildern: Hatje Cantz

· Strohm, Kiven 2012 ‘When Anthropology Meets Contemporary Art: Notes from a Politics of Collaboration’ Collaborative Anthropologies 5(1): 98-124

Week 10 – Future Directions and Recap

The complex issues engendered by the multiple intersections between all the actors that have roles in museums, art trade, and source communities (the makers of the arts outside the West) offer interesting new possibilities for the practice of both art and anthropology. In particular, they underscore the necessity of contextually evaluating the premises upon which professionals working in these fields may base their choices for working with specific communities. Contexts generated by the various connections between artists, source communities, collectors, gallerists and museum professionals indicate new exciting avenues for the exploration of alternative ways of working with and across disciplinary boundaries that so far have bound, both practically and discursively, activities and theories to their respective disciplines. In this session we explore new possibilities to advance novel approaches for dealing with art at the crossroad between art history and anthropology.

Questions:

1. How will museums deal with contemporary artists from areas well represented in their ethnographic collections?

2. What future productive areas of engagement can we foresee between source communities, collectors, and institutions (e.g. galleries, museums, art trade, and auction houses)?

3. How useful could it be to apply different strategies of interaction between source communities, collectors, galleries, museums, art trade, and auction houses?

4. To what extent art history and anthropology will remain separate domain of investigation in the foreseeable future?

5. Museums and galleries’ attention to artefacts limits our understanding of arts as the study of objects. Will there ever be a chance to challenge this model with alternative scenarios?

Suggested reading:

· Errington, Sherry 2005 ‘History Now: Post-Tribal Art’ in M. Westermann (Ed.) Anthropologies of Art New Haven: Yale University Press

· Schneider, Arnd 2017 ‘Alternatives: World Ontologies and Dialogues between Contemporary Arts and Anthropologies’ in A. Schneider (Ed.) Alternative Art and Anthropology: Global Encounters London: Bloomsbury

Suggested Bibliography

· Anderson, Richard L. 1990 Calliope’s Sisters: a Comparative Study of Philosophies of Art New York: Prentice Hall

· Appadurai, Arjun (Ed) 1988 The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

· Bakke, Gretchen and Marina Peterson (eds) 2016 Anthropology of the Arts London: Bloomsbury

· Baxandall, Michael 1988 Painting and Experience in Fifteenth-Century Italy Oxford: Oxford University Press

· Bell, Julian 2010 Mirror of the World: a New History of Art London: Thames & Hudson

· Belting, Hans and Andrea Buddiensieg (eds) 2009 The Global Art World: Audiences, Markets & Museums Osfildern: Hatje Cantz

· Berlo, Janet C. and Lee Ann Wilson 1993 Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas: Selected Readings Engelwood Cliffs: Prentice Hall

· Boardman, John 2006 The World of Ancient Art London: Thames and Hudson

· Boas, Franz 1955 Primitive Art London: Dover

· Brown, Alison and Laura Peers (eds) 2003 Museums and Source Communities: a Routledge Reader London: Routledge

· Buchli, Victor (Ed) 2002 The Material Culture Reader London: Berg

· Burt, Ben 2013 World Art: an Introduction to the Art in Artefacts London: Bloomsbury

· Carey, Frances (Ed.) 1991 Collecting the 20th Century London: British Museum Press

· Carrol, Noël 1999 Philosophy of Art: a Contemporary Introduction London: Routledge

· Coomaraswamy, Ananda 1956 Christian and Oriental Philosophy of Art London: Dover

· Coote, Jeremy and Anthony Shelton (eds) 1992 Anthropology, Art and Aesthetics London: Clarendon Press

· D’Alleva, Anne 2012 Methods and Theories of Art History London: Laurence King

· Danto, Arthur and Susan Vogel 1989 Art/Artifact: African Art in Anthropology Collections New York: Center for African Art

· Davis, Joy, and Pat McGuire (eds) 1994 Curatorship: Indigenous Perspectives in Post-Colonial Societies Victoria: University of Victoria Press

· Eban, Dan, Eric Cohen and Brenda Danet (eds) 1990 Art as a Means of Communication in Pre-Literate Societies Jerusalem: Israel Museum

· Elkins, James 2007 Is Art History Global? London: Taylor & Francis

· Elkins, James, Zhivka Valiavicharska, and Alice Kim 2011 Art and Globalization Penn State Press

· Errington, Shelley 1998 The Death of Authentic Primitive Art and Other Tales of Progress Berkeley: University of California Press

· Fillitz, Thomas and Paul van der Grijp (eds) 2018 An Anthropology of Contemporary Art: Practices, Markets and Collectors London: Bloomsbury

· Flam, Jack 2003 Primitivism and Twentieth-Century Art: a Documentary History Berkeley: University of California Press

· Forge, Anthony (Ed.) 1973 Primitive Art and Society London: Oxford University Press

· Foster, H. 1996 ‘The Artist as Ethnographer’ in The Return of the Real Cambridge: the MIT Press

· Freeland, Cynthia 2001 Art Theory: a Very Short Introduction Oxford: Oxford University Press

· Geertz, Clifford 1976 ‘Art as a Cultural System’ Comparative Literature 91(6): 1473-1499

· García-Antón, Katya (Ed.) 2018 Sovereign Words: Indigenous Art, Curation and Criticism Oslo and Amsterdam: Office for Contemporary Art and Valiz

· Gell, Alfred 1998 Art and Agency: an Anthropological Theory London: Clarendon Press

· Golding, Viv and Wayne Modest (eds) 2013 Museums and Communities: Curators, Collections, and Collaborations London: Bloomsbury

· Gosden, Chris, Elizabeth Edwards, and Ruth B. Phillips (eds) 2006 Sensible Objects: Colonialism, Museums, and Material Culture London: Berg

· Goody, Jack 2010 Renaissances: One or the Many? Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

· Gombrich, Ernst 2007 [1950] The Story of Art Phaidon

· Graburn, Nelson (Ed.) 1976 Ethnic and Tourist Arts: Cultural Expressions from the Fourth World Berkeley: University of California Press

· Grasseni, Cristina (Ed.) 2007 Skilled Visions: Between Apprenticeship and Standards London: Berghahn Books

· Harney, Elizabeth and Ruth Phillips (eds) 2018 Mapping Modernisms: Art, Indigeneity, Colonialism Durham: Duke University Press

· Harrison, Rodney, Sarah Byrne, and Anne Clarke (eds) 2013 Reassembling the Collection: Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous Agency Santa Fe: School of Advanced Research Press

· Henare, Aimiria and Martin Holbraad (eds) 2006 Thinking Through Things: Theorising Artefacts Ethnographically London: Routledge

· Hill, Greg, Candice Hopkins, and Christine Lalonde 2013 Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art Ottawa: National Gallery of Canada

· Hiller, Susan (Ed.) 1991 The Myth of Primitivism: Perspectives on Art London: Routledge

· Jackson, Michael 2016 The Work of Art: Rethinking the Elementary Forms of Religious Life New York: Columbia University Press

· Jessup, Lynda and Shannon Bagg (eds) 2002 On Aboriginal Representation in the Gallery Ottawa: Canadian Museum of Civilization

· Kampen O’Reily, Michael 2012 Art Beyond the West: the Arts of Africa, India and Southeast Asia, China, Japan and Korea, the Pacific and the Americas London: Lawrence King

· Karp, Ivan and Steven D. Lavine (eds) 1991 Exhibiting Cultures: the Poetics and Politics of Museum Display Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press

· Kirscheblatt-Gimblett, Barbara 1998 Destination Culture: Tourism, Museums and Heritage Berkeley: University of California Press

· Kreps, Christina F. 2003 Liberating Culture: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Museums, Curation and Heritage Preservation London: Routledge

· Layton, Robert 1991 The Anthropology of Art Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

· Levi-Strauss, Claude 1963 ‘Split Representation in the Art of Asia and America’ in Structural Anthropology New York: Basic Books

· Leyten, Harry and Bibi Damen (eds) 1993 Art, Anthropology and the Modes of Representation: Museums and Non-Western Art Amsterdam: Koninklijk Instituut van de Tropen

· Lippard, Lucy 1983 Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory New York: Pantheon Books

· Lonetree, Amy 2012 Decolonizing Museums: Representing Native America in National and Tribal Museums Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press

· MacClancy, Jeremy (Ed.) 1997 Contesting Art: Art, Politics and Identity in the Modern World Oxford: Berg

· MacClancy, Jeremy 1998 Being Ourselves for You: the Global Display of Cultures London: Middlesex University Press

· Macdonald, Sharon and Paul Basu (eds) 2007 Exhibitions Experiments London: Wiley-Blackwell

· Magiciens de la Terre [catalogue] 1989 Paris: Editions du Centre Pompidou

· Marcus, George E. and Fred R. Myers (eds) 1995 The Traffic in Culture: Refiguring Art and Anthropology Berkeley: University of California Press

· Marquis, Alice Goldfarb 1991 The Art Biz: the Covert World of Collectors, Dealers, Auction Houses, Museums, and Critics Chicago: Contemporary Books

· Mauries, Patrick 2002 Cabinets of Curiosities London: Thames and Hudson

· Morphy, Howard 1993 ‘The Anthropology of Art’ in T. Ingold (Ed.) Companion Encyclopaedia of Anthropology London: Routledge

· Morphy, Howard 2007 Becoming Art: Exploring Cross-Cultural Categories London: Berg

· Morphy, Howard and Morgan Perkins (eds) 2006 The Anthropology of Art: a Reader London: Blackwell

· Onciul, Bryony 2015 Museums, Heritage and Indigenous Voice: Decolonizing Engagement New York: Routledge

· Ong, Walter J. 1969 ‘World as View and World as Event’ American Anthropologist 71(4):634-647

· Onians, John (Ed.) 2008 The Art Atlas London: Laurence King Publishing

· Otten, Charlotte M. (Ed.) 1971 Anthropology and Art: Readings in Cross—Cultural Aesthetics New York: Natural History Press

· Paine, Crispin 2013 Religious Objects in Museums London: Bloomsbury

· Pasztory, Esther 2005 Thinking Through Things: towards a New Vision of Art Austin: University of Texas Press

· Phillips, Ruth and Christopher B. Steiner (eds) 1999 Unpacking Culture: Art and Commodity in Colonial and Postcolonial Worlds Berkeley: University of California Press

· Pinney, Christopher and Nicholas Thomas (eds) 2001 Beyond Aesthetics: Art and the Technologies of Enchantment London: Berg

· Price, Sally 2001 Primitive Art in Civilizes Places Chicago: University of Chicago Press

· Renfrew, Colin 2001 Loot, Legitimacy and Ownership London: Duckworth

· Rhodes, Colin 1994 Primitivism and Modern Art London: Thames and Hudson

· Root, Deborah 1996 Cannibal Culture: Art, Appropriation, and the Commodification of Culture Boulder: Westview

· Rubin, William (Ed.) 1984 "Primitivism" in 20th Century Art: (2 vols): Affinity of the Tribal and the Modern New York: Museum of Modern Art

· Schneider, Arndt 2006 ‘Three Modes of Experimentation with Art and Ethnography’ Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 14(1): 171-194

· Schneider, Arnd (Ed.) 2017 Alternative Art and Anthropology London: Bloomsbury

· Schneider, Arndt and Chris Wright (eds) 2006 Contemporary Art and Anthropology London: Berg

· Schneider, Arndt and Chris Wright (eds) 2010 Between Art and Anthropology: Contemporary Art Practice London: Berg

· Schneider, Arndt and Chris Wright (eds) 2013 Anthropology and Art Practice London: Bloomsbury

· Sharman, Russel 2007 ‘The anthropology of aesthetics: a cross-cultural approach’ Journal of the Anthropological Society of Oxford 28(2): 177-192

· Shelton, Anthony and Brian Durrans 2001 Collectors: Individuals and Institutions London: Horniman

· Sieber, Roy 1987 African Art in the Cycle of Life Washington: Smithsonian Books

· Simpson, Moira 1996 Making Representations: Museums in the Post-Colonial Era London: Routledge

· Sleeper-Smith, Susan (Ed.) 2009 Contesting Knowledge: Museums and Indigenous Perspectives Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press

· Stanley, Nick (Ed.) 2007 The Future of Indigenous Museums: Perspectives from the Southwest Pacific London: Berghahn

· Sullivan, Bruce M. (Ed.) 2015 Sacred Objects in Secular Spaces: Exhibiting Asian Religions in Museums London: Bloomsbury

· Summers, David 2003 Real Spaces: World Art History and the Rise of Western Modernism London: Phaidon

· Svašek, Maruška 2007 Anthropology, Art and Cultural Production London: Pluto

· Thomas, Nicholas 1999 Possessions: Indigenous Art/Colonial Culture London: Thames and Hudson

· Thomas, Nicholas 2016 The Return of Curiosity: What Museums are Good for in the Twenty-First Century London: Reaktion

· Van der Grijp, Paul 2006 Passion and Profit: towards an Anthropology of Collecting Berlin: Lit Verlag

· Van der Grijp, Paul 2009 Art and Exoticism: an Anthropology of the Yearning for Authenticity Berlin: Lit Verlag

· Venbrux, Eric Pamela Sheffield Rosi, and Robert L. Welsh (eds) 2006 Exploring World Art Long Grove (Illinois): Waveland Press

· Vrdoljak, Ana Filipa 2006 International Law, Museums, and the Return of Cultural Objects Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

· Westerman, Mariët (Ed.) 2005 Anthropologies of Art New Haven: Yale University Press

 

Max Carocci- May 2019 – Please note: parts of this syllabus may change at a later date.

Learning outcomes

At the end of this course you will have improved your ability to:

  • Recognise the different ways in which world cultures theories and approach art and visual cultures
  • Describe anthropological theories that have informed critical thinking about art material culture, art, and museum practices
  • Devlop your critical and analytical transferable skills useful to the study, assessment, and evaluation of art and aesthetics from around the world
  • Apply new and reflexive perspectives to an appreciation of art in its regional and global variability

About the department

Our Department of Anthropology was recently named in the top 40 in the world in the QS rankings. We are committed to cultivating a unique and creative approach to this discipline, and seek to encourage originality and apply these theories into the field. Part of this learning process involves “denormalising” or challenging the familiarity our own experiences, which each of consider the basis of normality.

The subject covers a wide range of study areas, such as politics and economics, and as such, embodies the University wide ethos of an interdisciplinary approach. We are especially interested in supporting all students by creating a responsive and collaborative learning environment, encouraging personal and social development both within, and beyond, the classroom. Anthropology pioneers new fields such as visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. At the core of this focus is a commitment to employing our theoretical framework into relevant practical areas, and to understanding and engaging with important contemporary global issues.

In addition to this short course, the Department hosts a number of exciting courses including:

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