Current PhD Students

Article

Here are some profiles of our current PhD students

 

 

Alexander, James

Supervisors

Brian Alleyne and David Oswell

Alvarez Lopez, Valentina

Supervisors

Bev Skeggs and Michaela Benson

Thesis Title

Meanings and Values in Domestic Reproductive Practices among Chilean Working Class Women

Armstrong, Miranda

After 10 years of a varied working life, including roles as a recruitment researcher and a voluntary sector project worker, I returned to education in 2010 when my young son began primary school. After an Access course, I studied for a BSc in Sociology at the University of Surrey and an MSc in Social Research Methods at the London School of Economics. 

I am also a writer who has produced and edited copy for commercial publications and contributed writing to national press, including Pride Magazine and The Evening Standard. I now maintain a personal blog

Contact

m.armstrong(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisors

Les Back and Yasmin Gunaratnam

Thesis Title

Experiences of Mothering and Emergence into Manhood in Black, Inner-City Single Parent Families

Research Question 

This thesis examines how lone mothers of African and Caribbean origin have raised sons to adulthood and how these sons have emerged into manhood. Sole parenting of male children by women has long been viewed as inadequate while historically social science scholarship and public discourse has pathologised the Black family, lone mothers within them in particular. The prevalence of this family form in certain Black populations has been implicated within a range of social problems, from inner city ‘riots’ to educational ‘underachievement.’ While these claims are generally unsubstantiated, empirical evidence available to either contest or contextualise these longstanding assumptions are emergent at best.

This research aims to produce constructive knowledge by centralising mothers’ and sons’ voices and perspectives. It strives to fully understand how and why some lone mothers and their sons succeed or survive despite social pitfalls while others do not. It takes seriously the role of the social conditions in people’s biographies but also focuses upon the worldviews, capitals and resources that enable people to overcome these. A rich and in-depth account of participants lived experiences will be developed through biographical narrative interviews and visually conveyed through a photo elicitation project.

Research Interests 

I am interested in exploring how experiences of the family and of certain positions in the life course are shaped by ‘race’, class and gender. 

Teaching

Graduate Trainee Tutor, SOC51007A Policing the State, 2017-2018

Conferences 

May 2016 ‘Reimagining lone motherhood’, part of Reproductive labour: Parenting beyond patriarchy, at Goldsmiths Graduate Festival 2016, Goldsmiths, University of London

November 2015 ‘Searching for reflections of oneself’ at Telling it like it is: Reflecting on the academic experiences of Black and Minority Ethnic university students University of Greenwich

Awards

ESRC PhD scholarship from the Goldsmiths/Queen Mary Doctoral Training Centre

Goldsmiths Graduate Fund Award (won jointly) for event, Reproductive labour: Parenting beyond Patriarchy

‘LSE Masters Award,’ a full masters scholarship from the London School of Economics

The Asher Tropp Prize for the best overall undergraduate performance from the Department of Sociology, University of Surrey

Joint winner of The Sociology Dissertation Prize from the Department of Sociology, University of Surrey

Baxter, Kiri

Supervisors

Bev Skeggs and Rebecca Coleman

Thesis Title

What's the' Matter' of Women in Sport? Bodies, senses and boundaries

Berrios Huerta, Maria

Supervisor

Alberto Toscano and Vikki Bell

Bhatti, Meena

Supervisors

Brett St. Louis

Bonhomme Cousino, Macarena

She is a Sociologist from the Universidad Católica de Chile, and obtained a MSc in Culture and Society at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Currently she is a PhD Candidate in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, and is a sponsored doctoral student of the research line ‘Geographies of Conflict’ at the Centre for Social Conflict and Cohesion Studies (COES) in Chile.

Before beginning her PhD, she was Lecturer on Research Methods at the MSc in Social Psychology, Universidad Alberto Hurtado (Chile). She also participated in several research projects on international migration in Chile at the same university, and in a research project on citizenship education and political participation of young people at P. Universidad Católica de Chile.

Previously, at the end of 2011, she did an internship at the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) in Geneva, collaborating with the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR), and the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD). Later, she worked as Research Associate at the Social Development Division of the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), in Santiago, Chile.

Contact

m.bonhomme(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisors

Les Back and Caroline Knowles

Thesis Title

Racism and Exclusion of Latin American Migrants in Santiago, Chile: Exploring the (re)making of ‘race’ and belonging in a multicultural neighbourhood.

Research Question 

This doctoral thesis explores the making of ‘race’ in a multicultural neighbourhood in Santiago, in the context of South-South migration in Latin America. In such a quest, the aim is twofold: to explore how ‘race’ is made locally in urban spaces in the everyday, and how ‘racially marked’ Latin American migrants claim their right to belong to urban spaces in the midst of social exclusion and marginalization. Drawing on an urban ethnography and in-depth interviews in one of the most multicultural neighbourhoods in Santiago, Recoleta, I explore the social and cultural relations and interactions that emerge within and beyond the residential neighbourhood where migrants inhabit and navigate in the everyday, examining the intercultural coexistence among neighbours, the everyday racisms, and the social conflicts that emerge. This thesis contributes to unveiling the historical power of racism in a context where such phenomenon has remained invisible and understudied, yet continuously shifting and shaping the boundaries of inclusion and exclusion in underprivileged multicultural neighbourhoods.

Research Interests

international migration, ‘race’ and racism, sociology of racism, urban studies, inequalities, cultural studies, visual sociology, social exclusion, citizenship.

Publications

Academic Journal Articles

Stefoni, C., Leiva, S. & Bonhomme, M. (2017) International migration and labour precariousness. The case of the construction industry in Chile/ Migración internacional y precariedad laboral. El caso de la industria de la construcción en Chile, Revista Interdisciplinar da Mobilidade Humana, 25 (49), pp. 95-112. (Special Issue: ‘Migrações, trabalho e direitos sociais’).

Bascopé, M.; Bonhomme, M.; Cox, C.; Castillo, J.C. & Miranda, D. (2015) Curricular Guidelines and Citizenship Attitudes in Latin American Students: A Comparative Analysis, Revista Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Niñez y Juventud, 13 (2), pp. 1169-1190.

Castillo, J.C., Miranda, D., Bonhomme, M., Cox, C., Bascopé, M. (2015) Mitigating the political participation gap from the school: The roles of civic knowledge and classroom climate, Journal of Youth Studies, 18 (1), pp.16-35.

Stefoni, C. & Bonhomme, M. (2014) A lifetime living in Chile yet still a foreigner/ Una vida en Chile y seguir siendo extranjeros, Revista Si Somos Americanos, Revista de Estudios Transfronterizos, 14 (2), pp. 81-101.

Castillo, J.C.; Miranda, D.; Bonhomme, M.; Cox, C. & Bascopé, M. (2014) Social inequality and changes in students’ expected political participation in Chile, Journal of Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, 9 (2), pp. 140–156.

Cox, C.; Bascopé, M.; Castillo, J.C.; Miranda, D. & Bonhomme, M. (2014) Citizenship Education in Latin America: Priorities of the Curricula, IBE Working Papers on Curriculum Issues, UNESCO International Bureau of Education (IBE).

Bonhomme, M. (2013) Material culture and Peruvian migration in Chile: An integration process from home / Cultura material y migrantes peruanos en Chile: Un proceso de integración desde el hogar, Polis, 12 (35), pp. 63-84. (Special Issue: ‘South to south migration: Global paradoxes and local promises’).

Book chapters

Stefoni, C. & Bonhomme, M. (2015) Lives that intertwine in transnational contexts: A route throughout work, family and social networks / Vidas que se tejen en contextos transnacionales. Un recorrido por el trabajo, la familia y las redes sociales. In W. Imilan, F. Márquez & C. Stefoni (Eds.), Rutas migrantes en Chile – Habitar, festejar y trabajar (Migrant routes in Chile – inhabit, celebrate and work), Santiago: Colección Antropología, Ediciones Universidad Alberto Hurtado, pp. 16-35.

Bonhomme, M.; Cox, C.; Tham, M. & Lira, R. (2015) Citizenship education in Chile ‘in action’: Teaching practices and expected political participation of students / La educación ciudadana escolar de Chile ‘en acto’: prácticas docentes y expectativas de participación política de estudiantes. In C. Cox & J.C. Castillo (Eds.), Aprendizaje de la Ciudadanía: Contextos, Experiencias y Resultados (Citizenship learning: Contexts, experiences and results), Santiago: Editorial CEPPE & Ediciones UC, pp.373-425.

Castillo, J.C., Miranda, D., Bonhomme, M.  (2015) Social inequality and changes in students’ expected political participation in Chile / Desigualdad social y cambios en las expectativas de participación política de los estudiantes en Chile. In C. Cox & J.C. Castillo (Eds.), Aprendizaje de la Ciudadanía: Contextos Experiencias y Resultados (Citizenship learning: Contexts, experiences and results), Santiago: Editorial CEPPE & Ediciones UC, pp. 459-486.

Cox, C., Bascopé, M., Castillo, J.C., Miranda, D., Bonhomme, M. (2015) Citizenship Education in Latin America: Priorities of the Curricula / Educación Ciudadana en América Latina: Prioridades de los Currículos Escolares. In C. Cox & J.C. Castillo (Eds.), Aprendizaje de la Ciudadanía: Contextos, Experiencias y Resultados (Citizenship learning: Contexts, experiences and results), Santiago: Editorial CEPPE & Ediciones UC, pp. 321-371.

Treviño, E.; Donoso, F. & Bonhomme, M. (2009) How Can Chilean Schools Improve Student Science Learning? / ¿Cómo las escuelas chilenas pueden mejorar el aprendizaje en Ciencias?. In Gobierno de Chile, Ministerio de Educación y Organización de Estados Iberoamericanos (OEI), ¿Qué nos dice PISA sobre la educación de los jóvenes en Chile? Nuevos análisis y perspectivas sobre los resultados en PISA 2006 (What does PISA say about the education of young people in Chile?: New analyses and perspectives on the results of PISA 2006), Santiago, pp. 71-104.

Conferences

XXXV International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), Lima, 29 April-01 May 2017. Paper ‘Exploring racism and social exclusión of Latin American migrants in a multicultural neighbourhood in Santiago, Chile’. Bonhomme, M.

XXXIV International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), New York, 27-30 May 2016. Session organiser and presenter in a panel sponsored by the International Migration Section: ‘New shifts in migration, spaces and racisms in Latin America: Discussing research methods for understanding South-South migration in Chile and Ecuador’.

Paper ‘Latin American migrants in Chile: Exploring racism, social exclusion and belonging through ‘live’, visual and participatory methods’. Bonhomme, M.

COES Annual Conference ‘Urban and Territorial conflicts: Contesting Social Cohesion?’, Santiago, 17-20 November 2015. ‘Racism and the exclusion of Latin American migrants in urban neighbourhoods: A critical review of literature and an exploration of new theoretical and methodological approaches’. Bonhomme, M. Moderador: Professor Tim Butler.

XXXIII International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), San Juan, May 27-30, 2015.

‘Racismo y Exclusión de Migrantes en Chile: entre lo visible e invisible’ [Racism and Migrants Exclusion in Chile: Between the visible and the invisible]. Bonhomme, M.

‘Diferencias regionales en la construcción del estatus legal precario de migrantes en el sector de la construcción’ [Regional differences in the construction of the legal precarious status of migrants in the construction industry]. Stefoni, C.; Leiva, S.; Bonhomme, M.

‘Condiciones laborales de migrantes en la construcción en Chile’ [Labour conditions of migrants in the construction industry in Chile]. Leiva, S.; Stefoni, C.; Bonhomme, M.

XXXXXI Annual Conference of the Society for Latin American Studies (SLAS), Aberdeen, April 17-18, 2015. ‘Making a home: materialising belongings, identities and memories in the experiences of exile and return’. Bonhomme, M.

Seminar previous to the public lectura of Professor Elizabeth Jelin, Reflections on 50 years of social research in Latin America, Latin American Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, October 17, 2014. ‘Exilio y retorno: dos procesos de inclusión desde el hogar’ [Exile and Return: two processes of inclusion from home]. Bonhomme, M.

III Congreso Interdisciplinario de Investigación en Educación (CIIE), Santiago, August 21– 22, 2014.

‘¿Cómo están siendo formados los futuros ciudadanos en distintos contextos sociales y culturales?: Múltiples perspectivas de la educación ciudadana en Chile’ [How are future citizens from different social and cultural backgrounds being educated?: Multiple perspectives on citizenship education in Chile]. Bonhomme, M. & Tham, M.

Conversaciones sobre Exilio [Talks on Exile], Museo de la Memoria y los Derechos Humanos, Santiago, August 6, 2014. ‘Pensando sobre el exilio: Dialogar sobre la investigación y reflexión académica sobre el exilio’. [Thinking about the exile: Discussion about academic research on exile]. Bonhomme, M. (presented with other expert scholars on exile).

XXXII International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), Chicago, May 21-24, 2014. ‘Exilio y Retorno: Dos Procesos de Integración Desde el Hogar’ [Exile and return: two integration processes from home]. Bonhomme, M.

XXIX Congreso Latinoamericano de Sociología (ALAS) (Latin American Congress of Sociology), Santiago, September 29–October 4, 2013:

‘La construcción de hogar de migrantes peruanas en Chile’ [Peruvian women migrants making a home in Chile]. Bonhomme, M. & Stefoni, C.

‘La distinción entre espacio público y espacio privado a través de formas de habitar desplegadas por migrantes’ [Distinction between public and private space through the ways migrants inhabit them]. Stefoni, C. & Bonhomme, M.

Teaching Experience

Lecturer, MSc in Social Psychology, Universidad Alberto Hurtado, Santiago  2013 - 2014. Courses: Research Seminar I  & II (Compulsory courses on Qualitative and quantitative research methods)

Teaching Assistant, MSc in Sociology, Universidad Alberto Hurtado, Santiago 2013-2014. Course: Thesis Seminar

Teaching Assistant, Department of Sociology, P. Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 2008. Course: Sociology of Education

Awards

Scholarship Becas-Chile Doctorate, CONICYT, Government of Chile, Santiago                             2014 (Scholarship funded by CONICYT to study a doctoral degree in the UK)

‘Premio Alumna Destacada Generación 2008’, Department of Sociology, PUC, Santiago           2010 (Best student of the 2008 class. Academic award given for achieving the best average mark in the class over five years of study).

Scholarship Becas-Chile Masters, CONICYT, Government of Chile, Santiago 2009 (Scholarship funded by CONICYT to study a masters degree in the UK)

Scholarship ITEC/SCAAP Programme, Government of India, New Delhi 2009 (Scholarship given by the Embassy of India in Chile, funded by the Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India. Programme to study English Communication in New Delhi: ‘Certificate of Proficiency in English Communication’ (Mar-May 2009). Given to applicants from developing countries around the world to promote intercultural exchange).

‘Premio Matricula de Honor 2007’, Department of Sociology, PUC, Santiago 2007 (Academic Excellence. Academic award given for achieving the best average mark of the class in 2006).

Participation in Research Projects

FONDECYT Project Nº 1130642: ‘Latin American migrants in Chile: labour precariousness and informality in ethnic enclaves, agriculture and construction’ (2013-2016). Head of Project & Researcher. Main researcher: Carolina Stefoni. Universidad Alberto Hurtado (UAH)

FONDECYT Project Nº 1120630: ‘Political socialization and school experience: Chile in an international context’. (2012-2015). Head of Project & Researcher. Main researchers: Cristián Cox and Juan Carlos Castillo. CEPPE & MideUC, PUC.

 

 

Borges Simoes Doe Reis, Jose

Supervisors

Alberto Toscano and Brian Alleyne

Brentjes, Rana

Supervisors

Brian Alleyne and Dorothee Wierling (Die Forschungsstelle für Zeitgeschichte, Universität Hamburg)

Burton, Sarah

Supervisors

Michaela Benson and Heidi Mirza

Thesis Title

Exploring Power and Legitimacy in the Making of Sociological Knowledge: A Study of the Craft of Writing

Carter, Adam

Supervisors

Vik Loveday and Monica Greco

Thesis Title

Laughter's Entanglement: Comedy taste, consumption and laughter

Chike-Michael, Ayobola

Supervisors

Caroline Knowles and Michaela Benson

Thesis Title

Nigerian UK Transmigrants: an Investigation of transnational practices through the lived experiences of London-Lagos 'Bridgers'

Cieszewska-Wong, Maria

Supervisors

Les Back and Yasmin Gunaratnam

Thesis Title

How Does Transnational Family Care Function in the Case of Aging Relatives? A case study of pre European Polish migrants and their aging relatives back in Poland

Claux Ferrand, Denise

Supervisors

Bev Skeggs and Paul Halliday

Corble, Alice

Supervisors

Mariam Motamedi-Fraser and Nirmal Puwar

Thesis Title

The Changing Public Forms and Value(s) of Libraries in Austerity Britain

Dabiri, Emma

Supervisors

Les Back and Rebecca Coleman

Thesis Title

Mixed Race after Identity

Dabrowski, Vicki

Supervisors

Bev Skeggs and Rebecca Coleman

Thesis Title

Young Women's Lived Experience of Austerity

Da Silva, Marina

Supervisors

Michael Guggenheim and Alberto Toscano

Thesis Title

The Concept of 'Visual pollution' on Public Space and its Relation to Social Dynamics

De Sutter, Adrien

Supervisors

Monica Greco and Martin Savransky

Eist, Katharina

Supervisors

Vic Seidler and Monica Greco

Eleftherakos, Ioannis

Supervisors

Caroline Knowles and Monica Sassatelli

Thesis Title

The Effect of the on-going Greek Recession on Two Neighbourhoods in Central Athens

Fernandez Ossandon, Rosario

Supervisors

Vikki Bell and Sara Farris

Thesis Title

Domestic Labour in Chile: performing intimacy, memory and the nation

Ghahremani, Ibrahim

Supervisors

David Hirsh and Kirsten Campbell

Thesis Title

A Sociological Study of the Ways in Which Iranian Elites Have Interpreted Western Political and Social Theory in the Development of 'Liberal Islam'

Gilbert, Holly

Supervisors

Nirmal Puwar and Vikki Bell

Thesis Title

On Memory and Place: Photography as a Practice of Mapping spaces of Postmemory

Gouldstone, Sian

Supervisors

Nina Wakeford and Caroline Knowles

Green, Secorro

Supervisors

Michaela Benson and Brett St. Louis

Thesis Title

The Black Middle Class in London: Agency, power and community

Halasz, Katalin

Supervisors

Nirmal Puwar and Nina Wakeford

Thesis Title

The Making of the White Woman

Harpin, Julie

Supervisors

Bev Skeggs and Marsha Rosengarten

Henneke, Laura

M.Sc. Urban Design, M.Arch. Architecture

Thesis: Arab Migrants in the City of Yiwu – The Impact of the New Silk Road on Chinese Urban Development

B.Sc. Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

TU Berlin, Germany Thesis: Dry Stone Wall Constructions in the Cevennes, France

Laura Henneke is a visual sociologist specialised in urbanism. She studied Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning at the Technical University of Berlin, completed a dual degree Master’s in Architecture and Urban Design at the Technical University of Berlin and Tongji University Shanghai, and is currently doing a University of London-funded PhD in Visual Sociology at Goldsmiths College, University of London. Her main research interests are the migration of transnational traders to and from China, the New Silk Road / Belt and Road Initiative, architectures of logistics and transportation, and visual research methods. She is co-founder of Present Spaces, a collaborative unit at the intersection of research, design, sociology and urbanism, and an active member of the CUCR as well as the PhD Migration Reading Group.

Contact

l.henneke(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisors

Caroline Knowles and Emma Jackson

Thesis Title

The New Silk Road: China’s rising impact on Socio-Spatiality in City Fringes

Research Question

On the 18th of November 2014, a train began its 8000 miles maiden voyage from Yiwu, East China to Madrid. Its arrival, 21 days later, strikingly demonstrates Europe’s presence in the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), also referred to as ‘the New Silk Road’. It is China’s grand strategy to expand its influence by means of ambitious infrastructure projects across its borders, into territories beyond. This proposed research asks: What is the visible and invisible impact of the China-Europe train route on the urban landscapes it passes? From selected vantage points in cities’ fringes, my research methods will engage with sites, where the train, commodities, people, and the built environment intersect. Using interviews, observation through still and moving image making, as well as spatial mapping, this study puts local social and spatial dynamics in context with the economic logics driving them. The project contributes to study on globalisation by bringing new forms of it to our gaze, and further to literature on the social impact of BRI, analysis of which is dominated by economists and experts of international relations who overlook its social and spatial dimensions.

Research Interests

  • Globalisation
  • Transportation Networks
  • Belt and Road Initiative / The New Silk Road
  • Transnational migration
  • Chinese diaspora

Publications 

Henneke, L. (2017) ‘Belt and Road Initiative: China’s Rising Impact on Socio-Spatiality in European Cities’, Mapping China Journal, 1(1), pp. 116–123.

Henneke, L. (2015) ‘Harmony Through Commerce - How Yiwu Embraced Islam’, MONU Magazine, pp. 42–48.

Teaching

Goldsmiths, University of London Course Tutor London, visual urban sociology course taught to 2nd year Sociology students.

Grants

2018: Newton Fund under the UK-China Joint Research and Innovation Partnership Fund

2017: Goldsmiths, University of London MPhil/PhD Scholarship 2017

Talks

Henneke, L. (2017) ‘Yiwu: Starting Point of the New Silk Road’. Navigating Urban Life: Mobilities, Goldsmiths, University of London, 30 November.

Henneke, L. (2017) ‘Yiwu, first stop on the New Silk Road: Shifting social and spatial dynamics in China’. Department of Sociology and Human Geography Lunch Seminar, University of Oslo, 18 October.

Henneke, L. (2017) ‘Roundtable Discussion’. Migrant Cartographies: Cities, Circuits & Circulations, Goldsmiths, University of London, 12 May.

Henneke, L. (2017) ‘Yiwu's Wholesale Market of Small Commodities: The Beginning of the New Silk Road’. Transnational Production Spaces, Habitat Unit, Technical University Berlin, 21 February.

Hickman, Timothy

Supervisors

David Oswell and Brian Alleyne

Thesis Title

Cyberbullying Experiences and Perspectives Amongst Gypsy and Traveller Young People

Hughes, Vanessa

Supervisors

Les Back and Heidi Mirza

Thesis Title

Undocumented Migrant Children: school as spaces of belonging and inclusion?

Jensen, Nele

Supervisors

Marsha Rosengarten and David Reubi (Kings College, University of London)

Thesis Title

What Matters, Where and How: evidence-informed policy newtorks and the making of knowledge in global health

Kenehan, Rachel

Supervisors

Les Back and Emma Jackson

Thesis Title

Young Men's Experience of Long Term Imprisonment 

Kinghan, Jacqueline

Supervisors

Kate Nash and Brian Alleyne

Thesis Title

Lawyers Changing Lives: A Narrative History of Progressive Lawyering in the UK

Lagos Rojas, Felipe

Supervisors

Alberto Toscano and Brian Alleyne

Thesis Title

Misadventures of Latin American Marxism: Intellectual Journeys towards the Deprovincialization of Marxist thought

 

Lanci, Yari

Supervisors

Alberto Toscano and Sara Farris

Thesis Title

Time and Exploitation of Labour in Foucault and Marx

Lee, Chien

Supervisors

Monica Sassatelli and Mike Featherstone (ICCE Department)

Thesis Title

Tourism, Photographic Gaze and the Art Museum

Le Vay, Lulu

Lulu Le Vay started out as deputy editor of Sleazenation in the mid-90s, propelling her into a busy career as a music and lifestyle writer for The Face, i-D, Jockey Slut and Xray through to the Guardian Guide, The Independent, The New Statesman and The Observer.

Alongside print journalism Lulu has also been a senior researcher on Channel 4’s The Jo Whiley Show, and has been a freelance reporter for Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour. Alongside writing she has also worked in PR, artist management and social media. She has recently won an award for her blog content for fitness group, Gymbox.

As a lover of music, Lulu also has a career as a DJ, playing regularly in London and across the UK and Europe. Lulu also lectures in music, sociology and journalism, and is a course creator and unit writer for a number of organizations. 

Lulu is a regular panelist at industry events, having spoken alongside the likes of Miranda Sawyer, Clara Amfo, and Roisin Murphy. She is also a copywriter and qualified subeditor.

Contact

Sop01llv(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisors

Bev Skeggs and Rebecca Coleman

Thesis Title

Representations and responses to surrogacy in the reproduction of the family

Research Question

This thesis explores representations and responses to surrogacy on TV and film. It examines how conventional notions of ‘the proper family’ are reproduced. Through textual analysis and audience research, this research explores how conventional ideals of family are constructed, and how female viewers interpret such values. A specific focus is on how narratives are articulated through varying genre devices, and how particular televisual techniques shape the viewer’s perceptions of not just surrogacy as a practice, but its place within normative family and motherhood. 

The thesis used textual and empirical methods. It demonstrates how dominant textual narratives are steered by the depiction of the heterosexual infertile characters as non-normative, in need of transformation into genetic mothers, through surrogacy or the miracle of natural pregnancy enabled by heterosexual love. Same-sex parenting and homosexuality are articulated as more acceptable when positioned within compulsory monogamy. Through the employment of queer theory as an analytical tool, conventional notions of family, motherhood and femininity are exposed, as any positions outside of this ideal are portrayed as ’failing to comply’.

The research with different audiences was conducted through focus groups, using clips from a selection of popular mainstream texts featuring surrogacy storylines – across sitcom, soap, reality TV and Hollywood mom-com. These texts were shown to three groups of women of different ages, professional, cultural and class backgrounds – mothers and non-mothers. Despite the adherence to hetero-norms that drive the narratives in the texts, what has emerged in the audience data are desires to see alternative, and less predictable, happy endings that not only position infertile female characters more positively, but which celebrate alternative formations of kinship situated outside of heteronormative monogamy and the genetic tie. The research respondents consider alternatives as meaningful, if not more reflective of contemporary structures of family.

This research reveals the temporal gap between mainstream texts, which uphold the white, heteronormative, genetically-reproduced family as the ideal, at a time when forms of families are continually diversifying, and when more women are choosing alternative life paths outside of marriage and motherhood. 

Research Interests

Cultural articulations of reproductive technologies, particularly surrogacy, Emotion and affect in television studies and Queer theory and the media

 

 

Levy, Claire

Supervisors

Les Back and Alex Rhys-Taylor

Lewis, Chantelle

Supervisors

Bev Skeggs and Emma Jackson

Thesis Title

When Does One Realise They are Mixed? An intersectional study on Race, Class and Gender

Lulu, Ashjan

Supervisors

Mariam Motamedi-Fraser and Alberto Toscano

Thesis Title

Anti-Colonial Resistance and Subjectivity Palestinian Hunger Strikers in Captive Revolution

McShane, Brian

Supervisors

Vic Seidler and Brian Alleyne

Maurer, Sandra

Supervisors

Abby Day and Adam Dinham (STACS Department)

Thesis Title

Religious Minority Student Experience and Student Faith Activism in HE

Merz, Sibille

Sibille holds a BA in Political Science from the Free University in Berlin, Germany, an MA in Postcolonial Culture and Global Policy from the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths and a doctoral fellowship by the Rosa-Luxemburg-Foundation. She has taught on core modules in the department and at the University of Warwick, and has worked in third sector organisations in Europe, India and Palestine alongside her studies.

Contact

sibille.merz(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisors

Brett St. Louis and Nirmal Puwar

Thesis Title

The heterogeneous Caucasian: Indian biologies between proximity and distance in transnational biomedical research

Research Question

This research project examines how, if at all, the concern over ‘racial’ disparities in drug response inflect the transnationalisation of biomedical research, focusing on the Indian clinical trial industry. Drawing on archival and qualitative interview data with scientists and regulators, and engaging with an extensive body of literature that has critically engaged the resurgence of racial biology in the postgenomic era, it examines how scientific ideas about race and ethnicity are put to work, translated and redefined when they ‘travel’ transnationally. Situated at the interface of the sociology of race and (postcolonial) science and technology studies, the project excavates the different scientific, political and economic factors shaping the incessant occupation with racial classifications, and determining which population differences are considered valuable but not others.

Research Interests

Sociology of race and ethnicity; science and technology studies; biopolitics; post-colonial theory and critical globalisation studies

Namberger, Fabian

Fabian Namberger obtained a Bachelor of Arts in political science at Free University Berlin and a Master of Arts in sociology (MA Critical & Creative Analysis) at Goldsmiths, University of London. From 2013 to 2016 he was associated researcher at the research unit peace and conflict studies of the Otto Suhr institute for political science, Free University Berlin.

Fabian works as an editor at the quarterly German online magazine kritisch-lesen.de. Kritisch lesen publishes book reviews and other contents on wider socio-political topics and debates, hoping to establish an undogmatic platform for critical thought and praxis between activism and academia.

Contact

fabian.namberger@gold.ac.uk

Supervisors

Alberto Toscano and Michael Guggenheim

Thesis Title

Car designers as urban planners: Re-shaping the city through autonomous driving

Research Question

My project explores how the autonomous car re-shapes our cities. Predicted to be widely available in the near future, the self-driving car injects powerful technologies – often military in origin – into the circuits of urban everyday life. From satellite navigation to automated surveillance and augmented reality systems, autonomous driving puts radically new demands on the form and function of analogue and digital urban space. To understand these shifts, my project combines perspectives from Marxist urban geography and science and technology studies with in-depth ethnographic research. Approaching the development of self-driving cars not as a pre-political “given”, but as a highly contested field that brings together and interweaves a whole range of urban systems, services, spaces and technologies, my project foregrounds car design as a powerful, yet often neglected spatial practice for re-shaping the urban fabric and our accelerating experiences within it.

Research Interests

Western Marxism and critical urban theory, the political economy of automation, logistics and infrastructure, science and technology studies (STS), political philosophy, postcolonial perspectives in peace and conflict studies.

Publications

Journal articles and book chapters

2018 Kartographien der Gewalt. Postkoloniale Blicke auf die (De-)Konstruktion von Raum in Forschung und Praxis, in Dittmer, Cordula (ed.), Post-/Dekoloniale Kritik in der Erforschung von Krieg? Eine Bestandsaufnahme der deutschsprachigen Debatte, Zeitschrift für Friedens- und Konfliktforschung Sonderband 2, 183-221 (with Gerdis Wischnath and Sven Chojnacki).

2014  Die »neuen Kriege« im Spiegel postkolonialer Theorien und kritischer Friedensforschung. Ein Plädoyer für die Befreiung von der Last der Vereinfachung, in Zeitschrift für Friedens- und Konfliktforschung 3: 2, 157-202 (with Sven Chojnacki).

Book reviews and Newspaper articles

2018 Die logistische Stadt, review of Cowen, Deborah (2014) The Deadly Life of Logistics. Mapping Violence in Global Trade, University of Minnesota Press, in sub\urban 6: 1, 161-165.

2018 Klasse und Hautfarbe. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor über Kämpfe in den USA, in neues deutschland, 10th January.

2017 Die globale Fabrik. Warum es den einen Ort des Klassenkampfes nicht gibt und weshalb eine Neue Klassenpolitik viel von den Räumen der Logistik lernen kann, in ak - analyse&kritik, Nr. 633 (12 December).

2017 Taylor, Keeanga-Yamahtta (2017) Von #BlackLivesMatter zu Black Liberation, review for online magazine kritisch-lesen.de.

2017 Fisher, Mark (2013) Kapitalistischer Realismus ohne Alternative?, VSA Verlag, Hamburg, review for online magazine kritisch-lesen.de.

2017 Reckwitz, Andreas (2012) Die Erfindung der Kreativität. Zum Prozess gesellschaftlicher Ästhetisierung, Suhrkamp: Frankfurt a.M., review for online magazine kritisch-lesen.de.

2016 Toscano, Alberto/Kinkle Jeff (2015) Cartographies of the Absolute, zero books: Winchester, review for online magazine kritisch-lesen.de.

Awards

AHRC CHASE studentship for PhD project “Car designers as urban planners” at Goldsmiths.

Teaching

Summer term 2016: Undergraduate course “Space Power Politics” at the Otto Suhr institute for political science, Free University Berlin (research unit political theory and philosophy).

 

Nicholls, Emily

Supervisors

Monica Greco and Marsha Rosengarten

Thesis Title

Enacting HIV in the Archive

Osborne, Andrew

Supervisors

Alberto Toscano and Sara Farris

Thesis Title

Can Arise Chicago Foster Political Participation Amongst Low-Wage Workers of Different Ethnicities and Develop Interethnic Solidarities Under One Roof?

Pacho, Agata

Supervisors

Monica Greco and Marsha Rosengarten

Thesis Title

Enactments of HIV in an HIV Outpatient Clinic: A study of practices, knowledges and experiences of HIV treatment in the presence of biomedical technologies

 

Palma Irarrazaval, Felipe

Supervisors

Nirmal Puwar and Monica Sassatelli

Palmer, Rachel

Supervisors

Yasmin Gunaratnam and Monica Greco

Peacock, Chloe

I have an MA in Anthropology from the University of Sussex and a BA in Anthropology and Sociology from Goldsmiths. I also have an MRes (Sociology) from Goldsmiths, undertaken as part of an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) 1+3 scholarship.

Before starting my PhD at Goldsmiths I worked in research and policy roles for a number of think tanks, charities and statutory organisations including the New Policy Institute, the Institute for Public Policy Research, Scope, Innovation Unit and Healthwatch England.

Contact

chloe.peacock(@gold.ac.uk)

Twitter

@chloepeacock87

Supervisors

Emma Jackson and Les Back

Thesis Title

Tracing punitive responses to the 2011 English ‘riots’

Research Question

My PhD project critically explores a range of reactions to the 2011 ‘riots’.

Using a Critical Discourse Analysis approach, it aims to examine how the riots have been constructed in media coverage and political rhetoric, and how this has played into the exceptionally punitive response to the riots from the police, the criminal justice system and the state. In doing so, it will explore the long term effects of the ‘riots’ in shaping debates around crime, justice, community, regeneration and ‘race’.

Research Interests

My research focuses broadly on cultural constructions of morality and justice, focusing on issues of crime and punishment. Alongside my PhD project, I am interested in exploring cultural constructions of issues such as debt, colonialism, and gentrification.

Publications

'Curative, regenerating, redemptive and liberating? The systematic production of ignorance in Michael Gove’s rhetoric on prison reform at a time of crisis. Crime, Media, Culture, November 2017

Reflecting on the Moral Economies of Debt and Punishment’. The Sociological Review, February 2017

Tracing Imperial Nostalgia at Cumberland Lodge. Streetsigns (Centre for Urban and Community Research, Goldsmiths), January 2017

Remembering the Riots: Citizenship and ‘Social Cleansing’ after the London Riots of 2011. The Howard League for Penal Reform, February 2015

Territorial stigma and regeneration in Tottenham. Open Democracy, February 2014

Conferences

'A conversation on connecting racism and migration’, Co-organiser (with Goldsmiths PhD Migration Reading Group) and panel chair. Goldsmiths, October 2017 

Awards

My MA thesis, which was awarded the Bill and Scarlett Epstein Prize for best MA dissertation from the University of Sussex, and the John Sunley Prize for postgraduate research from the Howard League for Penal Reform.

Teaching

I am a visiting tutor on the BA Design course at Goldsmiths

Peng, Ming-Te

 

I hold a MSc in Science and Technology in Society from University of Edinburgh and a MSc in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from National Taiwan University. My research interests focus on the rise in audit culture in academy and  neoliberal practices in the sector of higher education. In my research I draw on Foucauldian theory and Actor Network Theory. I am especially interested in the adoption of bibliometric indicators in academic evaluation as an instrument of governmentality in Foucault's sense.

Contact

mpeng042(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisor

Daniel Neyland

Thesis Title

Changes in Scholars' Scientific Knowledge Production Shaped by Bibliometric Measures

Research Question

Journal ranking systems is a quantitative order of academic journals in the world. It is conducted by calculating the ratio of citation numbers of each academic journal. A high ranking journal means papers in this journal are cited by other authors more frequently than papers in a low ranking academic journal. In other words, papers in the high ranking journal seem to have more impact than others in terms of citation numbers. As a result, the journal ranking system is regarded as a criteria to judge not only the value of an academic journal but also the quality of a research outcome.

The importance of journal ranking systems in academic careers has been increasing for several decades. Today several terms, such as the Science Citation Index (SCI), Journal Citation Reports (JCR), H-index and impact factors, have become part of academic life. The amount of published literature in high ranking academic journals has become one of the criteria used to evaluate the performance of a scholar, program, institution or even a school. Nowadays many researchers are concerned about the publication lists in their resumes. In addition, bibliometric measures are considered reliable indicators to use to distribute research funding to scientists compared to peer review.

In response to being measured, scientists might in turn modify their research proposal and publishing strategies to behave like a productive and effective scholar by maximising impact factors they own. Because the production of knowledge result in a deep impact on the development of technology, industry, culture, health and society, this study plans to investigate whether and how bibliometrics has shaped ways of knowledge production in academia.

Research Interests

Actor Network Theory (ANT), Foucault, STS, Neoliberalism, New Public Management, Bibliometrics, academic evaluation system and higher education policy.

Fellowships

Government scholarship to study abroad by the Ministry of Education, Taiwan

Conferences

Poster presentation at 21st international conference on science and technology indicators (STI2016)

Grants

Graduate School Funding for presenting papers at conferences in 2016

 

Perolini, Marco

Supervisors

Kate Nash and Sara Farris

Thesis Title

Does Migrants' Mobilisation in Contentious Politics Construct Human Rights?

Perriam, Jessamy

Supervisors

Daniel Neyland and Michael Guggenheim

Thesis Title

Demonstrating Disruption: How digital technologies demonstrate disruption in everyday life

Rivera, Ignacio

I am currently a PhD candidate at Goldsmiths University. I completed my MA in musicology at Universidad de Chile and my undergraduate studies in sociology at Universidad Católica de Chile. My research in Chile focused on oral poetry, folklore traditions, and the experience of female folklore singers. During the last three years, I have researched on the production of translocal identities in Latin American festivals in the UK, using concepts from performance theory (liminality, performativity). I am also an amateur musician and I have used the music and the song as a methodological tool to approach social reality and to conduct participatory research.

Contact

i.rivera(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisors

Vikki Bell and Monica Sassatelli

Thesis Title

“The performance of Latin American identities in translocal space: The case of ‘El Sueño Existe’ festival, Wales”

Research Question

My thesis focuses in the ways in which contemporary Latin American festivals in the UK contribute to the process of transmitting and performing. I am interested in the study of artworks and cultural expressions performed in festivals and how they contribute to recreate an idea of Latin America and generate community and belonging. The main questions of the research is: How do Latin American festivals participate in acts of transmitting and performing identity in translocal space? I argue that Latin American festivals are performative events that contributes to processes of identity formation through the reproduction and suspension of normativity. I am use as case study ‘El Sueño Existe’, a  festival of Latin American music and politics that takes place every two years in Machynlleth, Wales. Set up in 2005, this festival commemorates the legacy of Chilean artist Víctor Jara and the New Chilean Song. The research includes an analysis of El Sueño Existe Festival taking in consideration the perspectives of Chilean diaspora, musicians, political activists, Welsh residents and other people who have participated in this event.

Research Interests

Sociology of culture, sociology of music and art, popular poetry, gender, festivals, performance studies 

Teaching

Designed and taught undergraduate course ‘Sociology of Music’. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 2014.

Publications

Rivera, I. (2014) ‘Las Cantoras Populares en el Encuentro de Raíces de Portezuelo’. Fondo Nacional de Desarrollo Cultural y las Artes, FONDART REGIONAL, Consejo Nacional de la Cultura y las Artes, Gobierno de Chile

Rivera, I. (2013) Book Review: ‘Mario Rojas. El que sae, sae: crónica personal de la cueca brava’. In: Resonancias 33 p. 171-173.

Rivera, I. (2011) Roles y estructuras de género en la práctica del canto popular femenino. In Revista Chilena De Literatura [Online], 0(78).

Grants and Awards

Awarded with a scholarship from the Chilean National Scholarship Program for Graduate Studies, to pursue the MPhil & PhD in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. Sept 2014-Sept 2018.

FONDART Research Projects Grant. Chilean Council for Arts and Culture. Research about the role of popular female singers in the traditional Festival of Portezuelo, Chile. 2014.

FONDO DE LA MUSICA Projects Grant. Chilean Council for Arts and Culture. Production of music CD of Irene Belmar, a female Chilean singer. 2014.

Conference Presentations

‘Chilean Exiles in a Welsh festival: memory, justice and healing’ The UCL Americas Research Network Third Annual Conference, London, May 2017.

‘New Chilean Song and Victor Jara in translocal space: lifestyles and repertoires of the musicians of El Sueño Existe Festival, Wales’. Society for Latin American Studies Conference 2017, Glasgow, April 2017.  

‘Latinoamerican Music, Aesthetics and Politics in the Global Stage: The Case of 'el Sueño Existe' Festival in Wales‘. Third ISA Forum of Sociology, Vienna Austria. July, 2016.

‘Community, ethnicity and memory in Latin American festivals in London: a general review’ PILAS Conference 2016, Newcastle, June, 2016.

‘From Folklore to Hybridisation: the case of traditional female singers in the Festival of Portezuelo, Chile’. PILAS Conference 2015, University of Cambridge, June 2015.

'Reflections on discourses of Latin American culture and hybridization’. Society for Latin American Studies Conference 2015 Aberdeen, April 2015

 

Pulini, Ilaria

Supervisors

Michaela Benson and Emma Jackson

Thesis Title

Life in the London district of Kensington: Change and continuity

Regis, Tissot

Supervisors

Abby Day and Alex Rhys-Taylor

Thesis Title

Gentrification and Radicalisation in East London

Rondel, Louise

Supervisors

Alex Rhys-Taylor and Nirmal Puwar

Thesis Title

Powerfully Beautiful, Beautifully Powerful: The co-constitution of bodies and cities in the beauty salon

Rourke, Robert

Supervisors

Yasmin Gunaratnam and Mariam Motamedi-Fraser

Thesis Title

Habitual Favourites: A Quasi-Object Sensory Sociology of Autism

Sadikoglu, Rahme

Supervisors

Yasmin Gunaratnam and David Hirsh

Thesis Title

Identity Formations and Intangible Cultural Heritage in Post-War Cyprus

Shippie, Michelle

Supervisors

Brett St. Louis and Les Back

Thesis Title

Museum of Sensory Absence: Black Post War Migrant Experience of Race and Racism

Smith, Harriet

Supervisors

Michael Guggenheim and Alison Rooke

Thesis Title

How We Are With Animals

Stephens, Virginia

Supervisors

Michael Guggenheim and Francis Pine (Anthropology Department)

Thesis Title

Unravelling Organisational Closure: Working oneself out of a job in Kosovo's Development Practice

Strasser, Anita

I am an urban photographer / visual sociologist based in south-east London. I studied Photography at the London Institute (now LCC), completed a Master’s in Photography and Urban Cultures in the Sociology Department at Goldsmiths, and am currently studying towards a PhD in Visual Sociology. I am a member of Urban Photographers Association, International Visual Sociology Association, International Association of Visual Urbanists and the Centre of Urban and Community Research at Goldsmiths. I have exhibited widely in (inter)national solo and group shows, and have organised and curated many of those exhibitions as well. I am also co-organiser of the symposium Engaging in Urban Image Making hosted by CUCR Goldsmiths. For more information please see here 

I also have a Master’s in Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching from King’s College, London, and am a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA). I have been working as a Language and Academic Support Tutor on various programmes at University of the Arts London, including the MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at LCC. This involves supporting students whose first language is not English through their courses and help them prepare for their (mostly written) assignments.

Contact

Anita.Strasser(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisors

Alison Rooke and Alex Rhys-Taylor

Thesis Title

Spaces of Exclusion: investigating the impact of regeneration and austerity programmes on the every-day life of council estate residents in Deptford south-east London

Research Question 

This study utilises dialogical photographic research to explore the relationship between culture-led urban regeneration, austerity and the hidden injustices experienced by working class residents in Deptford to investigate how this process can build social capital for those involved. It is concerned with both the politics and aesthetics of culture-led regeneration. The cultural industries are central to making space for the creative middle-class, deploying culture as a convenient resource for capital growth, and promoting areas such as Deptford as creative quarters and possessing working-class multicultural authenticity to professionals and investors.

To counter this, a photographic dialogical aesthetic, an art practice-led research methodology informed by action research, is proposed. This explores possibilities of involving local residents who provide this authentic experience but feel marginalised by cultural regeneration in the image-making process to make politically and visually invigorating images with a long-lasting impact. It has the potential to create an inclusive process and cultural space for dialogue, action and reflection.

Research Interests

My main research interests are urban communities, the regeneration and gentrification of London, the representation of class, visual research methods and participatory photographic practice. 

Publications

2014/15 The Visual Urbanist, published by The International Association of Visual Urbanists, UK

2013 Backyard, issue 3, published by Backyard Publications, London

2013 Street Signs 2012/13, published by the Centre for Urban and Community Research, Goldsmiths, University of London

2012 The London Villages Project, book published by London Independent Photography

2012 Royal Hill, self-published book

2011 Deptford High Street, self-published book

2010 - 2014  fLIP, issues 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 27, published by London Independent Photography

2010 Third Greenwich Annuale, book published by The Viewfinder Gallery, Greenwich, London

2003/04 Tanečny listy (Magazine for Dance), Prague

2002/03 STREET Fashion Magazine, issues 21, 22, 24, published by UCM-Verlag, Salzburg, Austria

2002 Official UK Guide to Drama Training 2002, published by The Conference of Drama Schools, UK

Scholarships and Awards

2017   AHRC CHASE doctoral studentship for PhD research

2016  Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA)

2015  Goldsmiths Sociology Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement for the MA Photography and Urban Cultures Programme

2005  Kulturcapitalfonds Latvia (VKKF): scholarship for the documentation of theatre research project Synthesis of Voice and Movement, Latvia, Riga

2003  Kultur Land Salzburg – scholarship for one month residency in Vilnius Arts Academy, Lithuania

Conferences and Talks

2017 Organiser of Engaging in Urban Image-making: Symposium: Goldsmiths CUCR, London

2017 How are we relevant? Let’s talk about our area! Panel Discussion: Deptford Lounge, London

2017 Tales of Two Homes: Beckenham Photographic Society, London

2016 Using photography to facilitate social cohesion within a community: Symposium: Memory, Place, Photography, Centro de Informação Urbana de Lisboa, Lisbon

2015 Approaching the street: perspectives on social photography: Urban Photo Fest, Goldsmiths, London

2015 The Elephant’s Journey and the Creative City: Grounding Immobilities: Embodiment, Ephemera, Ecologies Workshop (presented by EASA Anthropology & Mobility Network @ Anthromob), Instituto de Ciências Sociais de Lisboa, Lisbon

2015 Family Photography: Beyond Representation and Towards Affect and Becoming: CSM Photography Conference ‘21st century Photography: art, philosophy, technique, Central Saint Martins, London

2014 From Observation to Interaction: Beckenham Photographic Society, London

2013 From Observation to Interaction: Mirage, Kent

2001 Nudes: Redeye (Association of Photographers), Manchester

Projects and Solo Exhibitions

2015 - Tales from the Stone Sea:  a visual ethnography of every-day life in this mountain range in the Austrian Alps - work in progress

2015  Oxenham House Neighbourhood Project: Oxenham House, Deptford, London

2014  Deptford High Street: Deptford Lounge, Deptford, London

2012  Royal Hill: The Greenwich Gallery, Greenwich, London

2010  Deptford High Street: St Nicolas Church, Deptford, London

2009  Eipprova 19: Galerie in der Zone (Arts Festival), Dritte Welt Laden, Saalfelden, Austria

2008  Eipprova 19: Eipprova Street Festival organised by The Urban Institute, Eipprova 19, Ljubljana, Slovenia

2008 Eipprova 19: Kavarna SEM (café at the Slovene Ethnographic Museum), Ljubljana, Slovenia

2005  Balticolours (impressions of the Baltics): Fotoklubs, Riga, Latvia

2004  A Season in The Ponec: organised by Tanec Praha (international contemporary dance festival), The Ponec Theatre, Prague

2003  Nudes: Gallery Na Farkane, Prague

2002  Nude and Fashion Photography: Caledonian Café, Prague

2002  Dance and Theatre Photography: Caledonian Café, Prague

2000  Male Nudes: Galerie Juettner, Vienna

1998/99 Homo-erotic photography: Centaurus (art shop), London            

Group Exhibitions

2016  Memory of Places: Centro de Informação Urbana de Lisboa, Lisbon

2015  Framing Urban Narratives: The Greenwich Gallery, Greenwich, London

2015  Greenwich Annuale #8: The Greenwich Gallery, Greenwich, London

2014  21 Years of Urban Change in Deptford: Deptford Town Hall, Goldsmiths, London

2014 50 Years of Goldsmiths Sociology: New Academic Building, Goldsmiths, London

2013  A Loose Traverse: The Greenwich Gallery, Greenwich, London

2013  RPS-UPF competition (Royal Photographic Society – Urban Photo Fest), The Greenwich Gallery, London

2013  Greenwich Annuale #6: The Greenwich Gallery, Greenwich, London

2012  The London Villages Project (LVP): Goldsmiths College, London

2012  Our Villages (Lewisham / Greenwich LVP group): The Greenwich Gallery, Greenwich, London

2012  The London Villages Project as part of Deptford X (Contemporary arts festival): Deptford Train Station, London

2011  Redundancies: as part of Crossing Lines, The Greenwich Gallery, Greenwich, London

2011  Nudes: as part of Misty Moon Exhibitions, Tank, Ladywell, London

2011  Brockley Max 2011 (Arts Festival): Ladywell Tavern and Hop Scotch Café (Brockley), London

2011  Misty Moon Exhibitions: Tank, Ladywell, London

2010  LIP 22nd Annuale: Strand Gallery, London

2010  Greenwich Annuale #4: Viewfinder Gallery, Greenwich, London

2010  Deptford High Street: (work-in-progress) as part of Crossing Lines, Viewfinder Gallery, Greenwich, London

2010  Open Salon: Viewfinder Gallery, Greenwich, London

2009  CW II (multi-media project by UK artist Adam Ramejkis): Grad Tivoli (International Centre for Graphic Art), Ljubljana, Slovenia

2006  CW I (multi-media project by UK artist Adam Ramejkis): Kirkby Gallery, Merseyside

2005  The founding of the ‘Anna Lindh EURO Mediterranean Foundation for the dialogue between cultures’: Alexandria library, Egypt

2005  Synthesis of Voice and Movement: Latvian Academy of Music, Riga, Latvia

1999  Home-erotic photography: Centaurus, London

1998  Female Nude: as part of end of year exhibition, London Institute, London

 

Takahashi, Kaoru

Supervisor

Michaela Benson

Thesis Title

Biographies of Migration: diverse trajectories of settlement among Japanese women in South East London

Takala, Ville

Supervisors

Roger Burrows and Evelyn Ruppert

Thesis Title

The Neoliberalisation of Social Data? Official statistics in the age of Big Data

Tascioglu, Irem

Supervisors

Vikki Bell and Alberto Toscano

Thesis Title

Constituent Power, Politics of Exception and the Failed Revolution: Trials Against the Military Junta in Turkey (1980)

Thomas, Philippa

Supervisors

Les Back and Michael Guggenheim

Thesis Title

'Enstranging' Criminology

 

Thongmuang, Chaturawit

Supervisors

Marsha Rosengarten and Brian Alleyne

Thesis Title

Queering Thai Sexual Identity and Culture in Digital Societies: A Sociological perspective

Tonhati, Tania

Supervisors

David Oswell and Kate Nash

Thesis Title

Family life in the Context of Migration: Brazilian transnational family rituals

Trifuoggi, Mario

I was born in Naples in 1986. My second hometown is Rome, where I studied political science and international relations, and worked for a few years. Later on, I committed myself to sociology. After having moved to London and earned a master’s from the LSE, I started my PhD at Goldsmiths. Besides urban sociology, my area of interest includes epistemology and social theory.  

Contact

mtrif001(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisors

Michaela Benson and Emma Jackson

Thesis Title

Negotiating Porous Space: Urban Informality and Street Life in Naples’ Historic Centre   

Research Question

This thesis explores the relationship between everyday practices of space and informal forms of governance in Naples. By means of an ethnography of the city’s street scene, it analyses the spatial logic of government and the frames of legitimacy that define urbanism in spaces of contention like that one under scrutiny, wherein informal institutions compete with the state for territorial control. Conceptualising the street as a field, the thesis investigates the forms of sub-cultural capital that regulate the negotiation of acceptable and non-acceptable uses and users of urban space; the aim is to reconcile the phenomenology of Naples’ informal urbanism with the city’s political economy (with particular regard to the production and exchange of protection, which is notoriously overshadowed by organised crime). To this purpose, the thesis focusses on the everyday life of one of the most ill-famed neighbourhoods of the historic centre, exposing how alternative practices of urban space are enacted, negotiated, and sometimes contested. To add historical depth to the study, a diachronic analysis of the territorial dynamics of different institutions engaged in the local process of urban governance (e.g. state actors, NGOs, criminal networks) complements the ethnography of the neighbourhood. The research design builds upon the thesis’ analytical framework, which discusses how the struggle of the Italian state over territorial control in the south of the peninsula has generated hybrid forms of urban governance upheld by informal stakeholders. Along the lines of the extended case method, the field-based approach is intended to investigate the link between this case study and the macro-historical forces at play in the Italian North-South socioeconomic divide. Ultimately, the thesis seeks to extend the case study to other scholarship of informality at the intersection of postcolonial and urban studies, rejoining a broader conversation about the nature of cities and the geography of theory.

Publications

Trifuoggi, M. (2015), “A Tale of Reverse Deviance: Non-compliant Spatial Practices in the Land of Gomorrah”, International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Vol. 35 No. 11/12, pp. 828-240.

Paper Presentations

Trifuoggi, M. and Varriale, A. (2017), “The Informal Housing Question: Contemporary Squatting in Central Naples”, RC21 Annual Conference, University of Leeds, 11-13 September.

Trifuoggi, M. (2017), “Orientalism in One City? On Doing Ethnography in Naples”, RGS-IBG Annual Conference, Royal Geographical Society, 29-1 August-September.

Trifuoggi, M. (2017), “Negotiating Porous Space: Urban Rituals and Neighbourhood Conflict in the Historic Centre of Naples”, BSA Annual Conference, University of Manchester, 4-6 April.

Trifuoggi, M. (2016), “Habitus and Place: Notes for a Spatialised Theory of Practice”, BSA Bourdieu Study Group Inaugural Biennial Conference, University of Bristol, 4-6 July.

Trifuoggi, M. (2015), “A Tale of Reverse Deviance: Non-compliant Spatial Practices in the Land of Gomorrah”, ECPR Standing Group on Organised Crime 1st General Conference, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, 11-12 December.

Departmental seminars

Trifuoggi, M. (2016), “The Regeneration of Confiscated Assets as Social Opposition to Mafia Governance”, University of Bath, 3 March.

Vivaldi Macho, Lieta

Supervisors

Vikki Bell and Monica Greco

Thesis Title

Abortion in Chile: Bio-politics and Contemporary Feminist Resistance

 

Walker, Sarah

Sarah is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths University, University of London. Her PhD research seeks to critically investigate the laws and structures that frame the lives of separated young people as they transition to adulthood in Italy. Adopting multi-modal forms of sociological methods, including ethnography, her research seeks to capture the complexity of the everyday, to investigate processes of belonging and exclusion in Europe

She has previously worked as a researcher and practitioner in the refugee sector in London and in academia, most recently at COMPAS, University of Oxford.

She is a Trustee of the Walthamstow Migrant’s Action Group (WMAG), which seeks to support migrants in the UK through promoting integration and challenging negativity.

Contact

swalk002(@gold.ac.uk)

Supervisors

Les Back and Yasmin Gunaratnam

Thesis Title

Happy 18th?: separated young people and the transition to illegality

Research Question

This research seeks to critically investigate the laws and structures that frame the lives of separated young people as they transition to 18 in Italy. Whilst there is a significant body of knowledge on the experiences of separated young people as children, relatively little is known about what happens after they turn 18 years old and institutionally are considered adult.  The difficulties and challenges these children face when they turn 18 have largely been neglected, both from a policy and an academic perspective. Using Derrida’s notion of hostipitality, it will explore how idealised conceptions of childhood, 'home', belonging and deservingness underpin the normalisation of return as the answer to this transition. By placing ethnographic lens on the lived experiences of separated young people in Italy, the research seeks to examine how young people negotiate the space created by migration regimes, and how they identify or resist the subject positions imposed upon them by such regimes and how they construct a sense of self through them. Theorizing mobility and illegality in relation to young people, it will examine how the Italian migration regime helps shape subjectivities, paying close attention to the ways in which child/adult binaries and ideas of deservingness may be replicated and challenged amongst separated young people and those working with them. As such it will problematize notions of the ‘deserving’ victim child and the undeserving adult and explore the morality underpinning the governance of mobility as the child grows up.

Research Interests

Processes of belonging and exclusion in Europe – particularly, the role of the state in the creation of vulnerabilities and the production of ‘illegality’

Youth, mobilities, the framing of migration and processes of labelling ‘sociable’ methods

Publications

Shutes, I. and Walker, S. (2017) ‘Gender and free movement: EU migrant women’s access to residence and social rights in the U.K.’, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 0(0), pp. 1–17

Humphris, R. & Walker, S. (2017) 'Home, Homelessness and ‘Go Home’: Scales of Migration Governance in the European Union', in Allen, W. et al. ‘Who Counts in Crises? The New Geopolitics of International Migration and Refugee Governance’, Geopolitics, 0(0), pp. 1–27. doi: 10.1080/14650045.2017.1327740.' 

McGhee, D., Bennett, C. and Walker, S. (2016), ‘The combination of “insider” and “outsider” strategies in VSO–government partnerships: the relationship between Refugee Action and the Home Office in the UK’, Voluntary Sector Review, 7(1), pp. 27–46

Inman, S., McCormack, P. and Walker, S. (2014) ‘Wearing your own culture: perceptions of Islamophobia in English Schools’, In Medaric, Z., Sedmak, M. and Walker, S. (eds.) Children’s voices – studies of interethnic conflict and violence in European schools, London: Routledge

Inman, S., McCormack, P., and Walker, S. (2012), ‘Islamophobia, Conflict and Citizenship’, International Journal of Progressive Education, Volume 8, Number 3 

Walker, S. (2011), ‘Access Denied: refugee children and the exclusionary logic of the education system in England’, Power and Education 3(3)

Walker, S. (2010), Something to smile about: Promoting and supporting the educational and recreational needs of refugee children, London: Refugee Council. 

Reports

Anderson, B., Shutes, I. and Walker, S., (2016), Report on analysis of European datasets on employment, inactivity and unemployment rates, bEUCitizen research report D10.2

Anderson, B., Shutes, I. and Walker, S. (2016), Citizenship and Work: Case Studies of Differential Inclusion/Exclusion, Report on research and data on hidden populations. bEUcitizen research report D10.3,

Anderson, B., Shutes, I., and Walker, S. (2014), Report on The Rights and Obligations of Citizens and Non-Citizens in Selected Countries. Principles of Eligibility Underpinning Access to State Territory, Citizenship and Welfare, bEUcitizen research report D10.1

Seminar

‘Accoglienza migranti: la lacuna dei neomaggiorenni’ [Migration reception procedures: the lacuna of 18+ youth] (May, 2017). For the public seminar: Arendt’s Children: Parole, storie e sguardi per ripensare l’accoglienza dei minori migranti, University of Bologna, Ravenna, Italy

Begging and the free movement of poverty. (2016). Talk for the Roma Discussion group seminar ‘THE ROMA IN THE NEXUS OF HOMELESSNESS, BEGGING AND RACIALIZATION’, Kings College, London, UK – 6th May 2016

Conferences

‘Wither AVR? Detention and its discontents. Problematizing the removal of AVR from detention centres in the UK through the lens of punishment and compliance’ (August, 2017) European Sociology Association (ESA) 13th conference (Un)Making Europe: Capitalism, Solidarities, Subjectivities. Athens, Greece, 29/08/17 – 01/09/17

Anderson, B. and Walker, S. (2014) Between a Rock and Hard Place: Assisted Voluntary Return and the Choice to Return, British Sociological Association (BSA) Conference ‘Changing Societies’, Leeds, April 2014

Inman, S. & Walker S. (2012), Islamophobia, Conflict and Intercultural Equality in the School Environment, European Conference on Educational Research (ECER), University of Cadiz, Spain, September 2012

Inman, S., McCormack, P. and Walker, S. (2012), Islamophobia, Conflict and Social Cohesion, CiCe, CitizED and Esmée Fairbairn's ‘Creating Citizenship Communities’ Conference, University of York, May 2012

Blogs

(2016) Begging and the free movement of poverty, Blog for Centre on Migration Policy and Society (COMPAS), University of Oxford, 08/12/16. 

(2016) media agendas and the corrosive use of water metaphors. Blog for Centre on Migration Policy and Society (COMPAS), University of Oxford, 22/03/2016

(2015) The numbers game: Illusions of control. Blog for Centre on Migration Policy and Society (COMPAS), University of Oxford, 10/03/2015.

 

Weston, Dean

Supervisors

Michael Guggenheim and Les Back

Thesis Title

Imaging Encounters: Towards a Wordless Sociology

Williams, Elaine

Supervisors

Les Back and Kalbir Shukra (STACS Department)

Thesis Title

'Knife Crime': Policing the Crisis in the 21st Century

Williams, Viktoriya

Supervisors

Evelyn Ruppert and Marsha Rosengarten

Thesis Title

"Making Data Tell its Story": Data science as a professional project

Yang, Shih-Ming

Supervisors

Mike Featherstone (ICCE Department) and Alex Rhys-Taylor

Thesis Title

Tea, its Transnational Taste and Branding

 

Yekta, Semire

Supervisors

Daniel Neyland and Evelyn Ruppert

Thesis Title

Social Construction of Online Fraud

Zschomler, Danny

Supervisors

Bev Skeggs and Adam Dinham (STACS department)

Thesis Title

A Road to Prosperity: Localised Pentecostal Transnationalism on the Old Kent Road