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Some of our upcoming free events and activities open to all.

Unless indicated otherwise there is no need to register for any of our events. All of our events are free.

Centre for Feminist Events Spring Term Programme, 2017
(with more to come!)


Wednesday 8 February 2017, 6pm, in the Media Research Building Screen 1
Rewind Fast Forward: Black, Queer & Proud: Sandi Hughes' History of the Liverpool Scene (1975-2005)

Sandi Hughes' extraordinary life - as a child raised in foster care, as a mother who fought a homophobic custody battle, and as an artist, feminist and DJ - is explored in the screening of three short films created from her archive – one by Sandi herself, and two more by artists Evan Ifekoya and Hayley Reid. A Q&A with the artists and hosted by BFI Flare film programmer Jay Bernard will follow the screening.

For more information see: rewindfastforward.net

27 February - 28 April 2017 in the Women's At Library, Rutherford Building
"Furniture without Memories": Feminism and the politics and poetics of remembering

“Furniture without Memories” is a site specific, two-month exhibition held within the Women’s Art Library, Rutherford Building, on Goldsmiths Campus co-curated by Julia Bieber and Chloe Turner. The exhibition is a multi-media installation that seeks to bring different forms of feminist story-telling into the exhibition space. The residency was made possible by the support of Goldsmith’s Annual Fund, the WAL, The Methods Lab and The Centre for Feminist Research. The exhibition is open to the public and entry is free.

Wednesday 8 March 2017, 6pm, in the  Professor Stuart Hall Building LG01
"Furniture without Memories" Exhibition Launch with keynote speaker Professor Avery F. Gordon (University of Santa Barbara)

Professor Gordon’s talk will discuss alternative forms of feminist remembering outside empiricist understandings of “evidence,” how we can listen differently to archival silences – to move between societal power relations and furniture without memories. What can feminist memory work learn from fiction and fantasy, not only when it comes to collectively remembering the past but also when it comes to envisioning and imagining different futures?