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Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre

Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre

The Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre was founded in 2007 with a £1.25 million grant from the Leverhulme Media Trust.

Department of Media & Communications

Inside the department

The Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre was founded in 2007 with a £1.25 million grant from the Leverhulme Media Trust.

During the five years to the end of the grant, in 2012, the centre has produced empirically grounded, interdisciplinary research on changing media spaces and design, focusing on five main areas:

Project 1: Spaces of News - researching the impact of the internet on journalism.

Project 2: Metadata In The Age of Ubiquitous Data - investigating the properties of metadata in digital media.

Project 3: Mediatising Place - understanding the creative applications of the internet for civic purposes.

Project 4: Europe in Motion - researching shifting media geographies and identities in Europe.

Project 5: Tracking the Moving Image - exploring the restructuring of public space by image technologies in Cairo, Shanghai and London.
The projects have produced numerous publications, public lectures, held annual symposia and a final three-day conference to present work publically and promote feedback. While each project has been autonomous, they also connect to each other. Combined, they present a complex picture of transformation, possibility and continuity in terms of new media’s relationship to society, offering a way out of the simple binarism that has previously limited the field of digital studies.

The Leverhulme Media Research Centre is continuing to grow. Part of its work entails harvesting the results of its initial programme of research. For example, project five (Tracking the Moving Image) has recently secured three book contracts in which to present different aspects of its work.

The Centre has also developed new initiatives. Thus, Project one (Spaces of the News) has been successful in securing grants from five sources - The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), Carnegie Media Trust, Open Society Foundation (OSF) and Kikawada Foundation. This has given its Spaces of News project a greater comparative, local and policy orientation. The Centre is also as much about doing as about analysis, and we hope to put in a theory-practice bid that involves media, design and computing in the future.

 

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