Students in a roundtable discussion sitting.

Centre for Research Architecture

Using spatial practices to investigate politics, media, ecology, and human rights.

Programmes

Inside the department

About us

Find out more about our unique practice-led approach.

Programmes

Study in one of our MA or MPhil/PhD programmes. New MA stream in Forensic Architecture now open.

Staff

Meet our staff and visiting scholars.

Research

Read more about the research projects being pursued by our staff.

Students

Explore the dissertation projects being carried out here.

Projects

Discover our collaborative work & groundbreaking research.

Spotlight

Spotlights and testimonials from students who have graduated from the Centre for Research Architecture.

The Centre for Research Architecture is a pedagogical experiment and political project that sits at the intersection of many fields and disciplines from architecture and media to law and climate science.

Practitioners from a wide-range of backgrounds will find themselves working within new conceptual frameworks and developing cutting-edge tools for undertaking spatial research and critical analysis. Our work is organised around practice-led research that investigates the urgent political conditions of our time.

COVID-19 UPDATE: Face-to-face teaching resumes in the Centre for Research Architecture this Autumn 2021 for all its practice-based teaching due to the fact that the Centre has a dedicated studio space allowing for social-distancing measures to be put in place. Open source investigations and remote sensing are already part of our investigative tool-kit so exploring sites and their spatial politics from afar is already at the heart of what we do.

We also plan to use the complex urban fabric of the city of London and River Thames as field sites to engage in “walkshops” and other off-site open learning initiatives. Rather than viewing Covid-19 solely as an obstacle to hands-on experiences in the classroom we wish to use the situation to expand the horizons of our pedagogical approaches and research methods.


Remote teaching this past spring has been surprisingly productive in many ways allowing us to bring guests to the Centre that we could normally never host due financial and visa restrictions. It has also motivated our PhD students, who are dispersed because of their fieldwork activities, to run weekly peer-to-peer reading seminars with invited guests - this was so productively useful for their individual circumstances that they will continue to run these weekly remote sessions in future.

We welcome new students to the Centre for this coming academic year and are committed to ensuring that your post-graduate experience will be as rewarding and enriching as it has always been.

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