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Games and graphics

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Research staff working in games & graphics

Simon Colton  /  Rebecca Fiebrink  /  Marco Gillies  /  Jeremy Gow  /  William Latham  /  Frederic Fol Leymarie  /  Sylvia Xueni Pan  /  Atau Tanaka  /  Robert Zimmer

Screenshot of a computer game

Angelina

Developing an artificial intelligence that can automatically design videogames. EPSRC-funded. Michael Cook, Simon Colton and Jeremy Gow. Games by Angelina website

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RapidMix

Technology transfer consortium developing innovative interface products for music, gaming, and e-Health applications. EU-funded project led by Atau Tanaka, Mick Grierson and Rebecca Fiebrink. Rapid Mix website

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BioBlox

A multimedia interactive platform/game combining 3D and 2D visualisations of molecules. Frederic F. Leymarie, William Latham working with BBSRC Unity, Havok Intel, Swrve and Imperial College. BioBox website

Photo of a city street

ProGen

Procedural city generation and architecture. Working with Innovate UK, Rebellion Studios and UCL Computer Science Department. ProGen website

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Centre for Doctoral Training in Intelligent Games & Game Intelligence

A four year EPSRC-funded PhD programme training the next generation of researchers in digital games research, in collaboration with York and Essex Universities and over 50 games companies. Atau Tanaka, Jeremy Gow, William Latham, Simon Colton. IGGI website

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Human Interactive conference

International conference focussed on man/machine interaction. W.Latham and F. F. Leymarie. Human Interactive website‌‌

Image of squiggly 3D modelled cells

FoldSynth

Contact map mapping of protein structures. Frederic F. Leymarie, W.Latham, S.Todd and P.Todd, with Imperial College and Oxford University. FoldSynth website

William Latham stands in front of a computer graphic

Mutator 1 & 2

Procedural art and exhibition. W.Latham, S.Todd, F. F. Leymarie, P.Todd with the Development Arts Council. Mutator website

A photo of hallways indoors

Digital Cultural Heritage

Data capture, such as laser scanning of archaeological sites and artefacts, and visualisations and simulations of past environments. Kate Devlin and Frederic Fol Leymarie.