Dr Dagmar Myslinska

Staff details

Position Lecturer
Department Law
Email d.myslinska (@gold.ac.uk)
Dr Dagmar Myslinska

Dagmar Myslinska completed a fully-funded PhD at the Department of Law at the London School of Economics, under the supervision of Professor Nicola Lacey and Dr Coretta Phillips, which critically examines Poles’ experience of mobility and their positioning within EU and UK equality frameworks. Dagmar graduated from Yale University with a BA (cum laude) in Psychology and Film Studies, with distinctions in both majors. She received her Juris Doctor degree from Columbia University School of Law, where she was the Head Notes Editor for the Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, and a recipient of the Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar award. She was admitted to the New York and New Jersey state bars in 2005.

Teaching

Prior to joining Goldsmiths Law, Dagmar taught modules on commercial law, evidence law, and legal research and writing at the LSE. She has lectured at several undergraduate and postgraduate criminal justice and law programmes in the USA, including at Columbia Law School, State University of New York, and Fordham University, and has taught at a postgraduate law programme at Temple University in Tokyo. She has also supervised clinical students practicing immigration law, and overseen Juris Doctor and LLM students writing their dissertations.

In her teaching, Dagmar seeks to place law within its cultural, ethical, and socio-political contexts, often drawing on critical race theory and human rights perspectives. She also incorporates case studies from her own legal practice to provide experiential learning opportunities, while critically examining the foundations of laws. Her overarching teaching goals have been to guide students towards thinking creatively and critically, and to inspire them to pursue social justice.

Public Engagement

Before entering academia, Dagmar practised commercial litigation and pro bono immigration law. She worked at the law firms of Debevoise & Plimpton, Boies, Schiller & Flexner, and Davis Polk & Wardwell in New York. She was involved in several high-profile cases, including representing institutional and individual investors in Madoff feeder funds, same-sex couples in a challenge to Proposition 8 in California, and Maurice Greenberg in his disputes with AIG.

She also clerked for two federal judges in the USA, including in the Southern District of New York. Dagmar has volunteered extensively for immigrant and refugee charities and NGOs, including Human Rights First in New York. Her numerous open-access reference articles on US asylum law have been published online by Nolo Press.

She has been interviewed and quoted by various media outlets on migration issues. She has also presented continuing-education seminars to US attorneys.

Featured Publications

Retracing the Right to Free Movement: Mapping a Path Forward (2019) Michigan St International Law Review 27(3): 383-439

Contemporary First-Generation European-Americans: The Unbearable ‘Whiteness’ of Being
(2014) Tulane Law Review 88: 559-625

Intra-Group Diversity in Education: What If Abigail Fisher Were An Immigrant. . . (2014) Pace Law Review 34: 736-816

Racist Racism: Complicating Whiteness Through the Privilege & Discrimination of Westerners in Japan (2014) UMKC Law Review 83: 1-55

Media

  • LexisNexis Library and PSL Products, London (August 2018): interviewed for ‘The Housing Crisis – Asylum Seekers and Immigration’
  • Polish Online News ‘Sheffield24’, Sheffield (June 2017): interviewed for ‘Polskie dzieci na Wyspach: Prymusi czy nieuki?’ (‘Polish Children on the Islands: Top Students Or Slackers?’), 
  • Ratio: The Magazine of LSE Law (2017): interviewed for ‘The Brexit Effect: How the Referendum Result Impacts Our PhD Research’
  • LSE Brexit Vote Blog (September 2016): ‘Post-Brexit hate crimes against Poles are an expression of long-standing prejudices and contestation over white identity in the UK’, 
  • Radio France Online, London (September 2016): interviewed for ‘Hate Crimes, Immigration, and Brexit’, 9 September 2016
  • The Times, London (August 2016): quoted in ‘City has just the recipe for integration: Peterborough has embraced 10,000 Poles (and their cuisine) to its benefit’
  • LSE Brexit Vote Blog (June 2016): ‘Migration Arguments Supporting Brexit Appear to be Backed by Animus’, 
  • LSE Brexit Vote Blog (March 2016): ‘Incomplete Europeans: Polish Migrants’ Experience of Discrimination in the UK is Complicated by Their Whiteness’, 
  • LSE Research Highlights (February 2016): research featured on ‘Poles and Prejudice’, 
  • New York State Bar Association CLE Webcast, New York (May 2012): panellist on ‘Growing Your Practice or Corporate Legal Department: Virtual Law Firms and Of Counsel Arrangements’

Research Interests

Dagmar’s research expertise falls at the intersection of law, migration, and race studies. She has published on how contemporary migrants have been approached under various jurisdictions’ equality frameworks, including in the UK, EU, USA, and Japan. Her current research project looks at the evolution of EU citizens’ rights during the unique post-referendum, pre-Brexit socio-legal and political regime.

She is also working on publishing her doctoral monograph. Her research is interdisciplinary and draws heavily on sociology, politics, geography, and postcolonial studies. Her academic publications have featured on leading US journals such as Tulane Law Review and PACE Law Review and have also been featured on several blogs, including the ImmigrationProfBlog, the Legal Theory Blog, Race Racism and the Law, The Book Forum, and the American Immigrant Policy Portal. Dagmar had been invited to present her scholarship at numerous international conferences, including in Australia, Canada, France, Mexico, Korea, the UK, and the USA.

Dagmar has served as a peer reviewer for the McGill Law Journal, and an assistant editor for the LSE Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series. She is currently a manuscript peer referee for the University of Bologna Law Review.

Publications

Article

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2019. Retracing the Right to Free Movement: Mapping a Path Forward. Michigan State International Law Review, 27(3), pp. 383-439. ISSN 2328-3068

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2014. Contemporary First-Generation European-Americans: The Unbearable 'Whiteness' of Being. Tulane Law Review, 88(3), pp. 559-625. ISSN 0041-3992

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2014. Racist Racism: Complicating Whiteness Through the Privilege & Discrimination of Westerners in Japan. UMKC Law Review, 83(1), pp. 1-55.

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2014. Intra-Group Diversity in Education: What If Abigail Fisher Were An Immigrant. . . Pace Law Review, 34(2), pp. 736-813. ISSN 0272-2410

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. Chances of Winning a Grant of Asylum. Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. Living Conditions in Immigration Detention Centers. Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. Preparing Persuasive Documents for Your Asylum Application. Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. Can I Still Apply for Asylum After the One-Year Filing Deadline? Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. What a "Particular Social Group" Means for Asylum Purposes. Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. How to Prepare an Affirmative Asylum Application. Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. How to Apply for a Work Permit While Awaiting an Asylum Decision. Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. Timing of the Affirmative Asylum Application Process. Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. What Will Happen at Your Master Calendar Hearing? Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2012. Can I Apply for Asylum With a Criminal Record? Nolo’s Legal Encyclopedia,

Digital

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2016. Post-Brexit hate crimes against Poles are an expression of long-standing prejudices and contestation over white identity in the UK.

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2016. Migration Arguments Supporting Brexit Appear to be Backed by Animus.

Myslinska, Dagmar R. 2016. Incomplete Europeans: Polish Migrants’ Experience of Discrimination in the UK is Complicated by Their Whiteness.