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BA (Hons) Applied Social Science, Community Development & Youth Work

  • UCAS
    L530
  • Entry requirements
    A-level: CC
    BTEC: MPP
    IB: Successful completion
  • Length
    3 years full-time
  • Department
    Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies

Course overview

This programme is ideal if you have some experience of community and youth work. Challenging, dynamic and interactive, it presents opportunities for critical reflection and exploration of recent developments in the field.

Why study BA Applied Social Science, Community Development & Youth Work at Goldsmiths?

  • You'll undertake placements in several community and youth work settings, and will gain invaluable experience that will enhance your employability
  • The degree can lead to careers in the broad community development, community and youth work field in statutory, voluntary and independent sectors
  • Our lecturers have extensive experience in the community and youth work sector, and work closely with you to maximise your potential
  • You'll learn how to analyse relevant theoretical concepts and social policies, and how to link them to practical situations and your personal practice
  • You'll attend a three-day residential module in the January of the first year, where you'll get to know other students and staff, while participating in programmed activities
  • Teaching methods encourage  student participation, and include lectures, seminars, group and individual tutorials, group work training meetings, workshops and practical exercises
  • The degree is professionally recognised by the National Youth Agency (NYA) and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers (JNC)

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact David Woodger

Modules & structure

 

Residential

The residential at the beginning of the second term in the first year provides the opportunity for you get to know other students and staff, while participating in student-programmed activities. The module takes place at a residential centre and there is no extra cost.

Level 4

Applied Research Methods I (30 credits)

Aim: To improve skills in observation, perceptions and sensitivity to signals related to the population living.

Assessment:

  • 56 hours of fieldwork practice
  • Land use survey exercise
  • Presentation

Weighting: 50%

Element 2 title: Contemporary Social Issues

Aim: Introduction to a range of issues relevant to community and youth work practice and development.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay of 2,000 words
  • Seminar presentation
  • 1,000 word synopsis

Weighting: 50%

Community & Youth Work I (15 credits)

Aim: To develop an understanding of the development of youth and community work particularly in relation to urban societies and youth service history.  To examine the role of the community and youth worker and explore the skills, knowledge, abilities and competence’s required for effective practice.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay of 2,000 words

Weighting: 50%

Element 2 title: Social Policy

Aim: To examine the origins and development of the welfare state. To introduce students to decision making procedures in local and central government. To examine different approaches to the development of social policy and its impact on young people, the family and communities.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay of 2,000 words

Weighting: 50%

Organisation & Management I (15 credits)

Aim: To focus on the skills needed for the effective management of self. To introduce students to the concept of leadership. To monitor and maintain performance in relation to self and teams.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay of 2,000 words

Weighting: 50%

Element 2 title: Group Work

Aim: To introduce students to of group work practice in community and youth work. To improve students understanding of issues related to race, gender, sexuality and culture. To introduce students to tools for self-reflection. To introduce students to informal education methods.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay of 1,000 words

Weighting: 50%

Fieldwork Practice I (60 credits)

Aim: To introduce students to the varied range of organizations, agencies and services relevant to community and youth work practice. To enable students to explore the distinctions between, voluntary, statutory services, their organisation, and practice. To introduce students to recent developments in the way that community and youth work is funded and practiced.

Assessment:

  • 1 fieldwork essay of 2,000 words (75%)
  • 1 self-assessment of 1,000 words (25%)
  • 280 hours' fieldwork practice (Pass/Fail)

Satisfactory fieldwork assessments submitted by the fieldwork agency and based on the assessment criteria and the negotiated contract between the personal tutor, the student and fieldwork supervisor. The responsibility for assessing fieldwork practice rests with the Personal tutor and is submitted on the basis of pass or fail.

Weighting: 100%

Level 5

Applied Research Methods II (30 credits)

Aim: To increase knowledge of qualitative and quantitative research methods, and their application to community and youth work practice.

Assessment:

  • 1 community analysis – 3,000 words

Weighting: 100% 

Organisation & Management II (15 credits)

Aim: To introduce students to theories of management. To examine the impact that class, race, gender, sexuality, and disability have on managerial responsibilities in the workplace.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay – 2,000 words

Weighting: 50%

Element 2 title: Social Policy, Community & Youth Work

Aim: To examine a variety of social and political issues within which contemporary community and youth work is practised.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay – 2,000 words

Weighting: 50% 

Fieldwork Practice II (60 credits)

Aim: Practical fieldwork experience.

Assessment:

  • 1 fieldwork essay of 2,500 words (75%)
  • 1 self-sssessment of 1,000 words (25%)

 

  • 280 hours' fieldwork practice (Pass/Fail)
  • Satisfactory fieldwork assessments submitted by the fieldwork agency and based on the assessment criteria and the negotiated contract between the personal tutor, the student and fieldwork supervisor.

The responsibility for assessing fieldwork practice rests with the personal tutor and is on pass or fail basis.

Weighting: 100%

Personal & Professional Development (15 credits)

Aim: To develop the necessary skills and knowledge necessary for effective communication and understanding with colleagues and clients. To increase awareness of self and the impact on others.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay – 1,000 words

Weighting: 25%

Element 2 title: Group Work

AIM: To develop students understanding  of group work practice in community and youth work. To improve students understanding of issues related to race, gender, sexuality and culture. To introduce students to tools for self-reflection. To examine the relationship between power and oppression.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay – 2,000 words

Weighting: 75%

Community & Youth Work Development (15 credits)

Aim: To critically evaluate current community and youth work theory and practice. To critically evaluate the definitions of ‘community’, ‘community development’ and ‘community work’.

Assessment:

  • 1 Essay – 2,000 words

Weighting: 50%

Element 2 title: Applied Research Methods

Aim: To develop critical understanding of a range of research methods including participatory methods. To develop an understanding of research ethics.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay – 2,000 words

Weighting: 50%

Organisation & Management III (15 credits)

Aim: To enable students to analyse and critically reflect upon differing themes and perspectives on management. To develop students’ management skills and the ability to relate these to different theories. To enable students to effectively manage and develop strategies for change.

Assessment:

  • 1 Training Presentation

Weighting: 50%

Element 2 title: Social Policy

Aim: To develop a critical understanding of different perspectives on relevant social policies, including regeneration, anti-poverty strategies health, education, and youth policies. To develop a critical understanding of varying political ideologies and their impact on policies and practice.

Assessment:

  • 1 essay – 2,000 words

Weighting: 50%

Fieldwork Practice III (45 credits)

Aim: To enable students to plan, implement and evaluate appropriate community and youth work interventions. To enable students to undertake assessment and evaluation of community and youth work organisations.

Assessment:

  • 1 fieldwork essay of 2,500 words (75%)
  • 1 self-assessment of 1,000 words (25%)
  • 280 hours' fieldwork practice (Pass/Fail)

Satisfactory fieldwork assessments submitted by the fieldwork agency and based on the assessment criteria and the negotiated contract between the personal tutor, the student and fieldwork supervisor. The responsibility for assessing fieldwork practice rests with the personal tutor and is submitted on the basis of pass or fail.

Weighting: 100%

Dissertation (45 credits)

Aim: To provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate originality in identifying a topic or line of argument and to follow up insights with a more systematic piece of research.

Assessment:

  • 1 dissertation of 8,000 words

Weighting: 100%

Credits and levels of learning

An undergraduate honours degree is made up of 360 credits – 120 at Level 4, 120 at Level 5 and 120 at Level 6. If you are a full-time student, you will usually take Level 4 modules in the first year, Level 5 in the second, and Level 6 modules in your final year. A standard module is worth 30 credits. Some programmes also contain 15-credit half modules or can be made up of higher-value parts, such as a dissertation or a Major Project.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Entry requirements

A-level: CC
BTEC: MPP
International Baccalaureate: Successful completion

You should have one year's full-time (or two years' part-time) work experience (paid or voluntary) in a related field, and evidence of academic achievement at Level 3 (A-level) standard; preferably two A-level passes or equivalent and three GCSE passes or equivalent. In some cases it may be possible to admit applicants on the basis of practical experience alone, provided that evidence of this experience is presented at interview.

Equivalent qualifications
We accept a wide range of qualifications equivalent to the ones listed above. This includes:

Access: Pass with 45 Level 3 credits including a number of distinctions/merits in subject specific modules
Scottish qualifications: CCCCC (Higher), CC (Advanced Higher)
European Baccalaureate: 60%

If your qualifications are from another country, find out more about the qualifications we accept from around the world

English language requirements
If English isn’t your first language, you’ll need to meet our English language requirements to study with us. 

For this programme we require:

IELTS 6.5 (with a minimum of 6.5 in the written test and no individual test lower than 6.0)

If you need assistance with your English language, we offer a range of courses that can help prepare you for degree-level study.

Fitness to train
You'll need to meet fitness to train criteria to be considered for this programme.

Read more about our general entrance requirements

Department

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies
has human relationships at its heart

Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

We offer programmes in Community Studies, Social Work, and Therapeutic Studies.

Our degrees are informed by our commitment to social justice and applied practices – whether you want to:

  • understand and challenge the ways that vulnerable individuals and groups are disadvantaged and marginalised
  • become a social worker, community and youth worker, therapist or counsellor
  • change people’s lives through dance, drama and music

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

Find out more about the Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies

Skills & careers

Skills

The programme will give you practical experience in several community and youth work settings – having this real-world experience will set you apart in the job market. In addition you will develop the following transferable skills:

  • Critical analysis of theoretical concepts
  • critical reflection
  • teamwork
  • organisational skills
  • motivation
  • research methods

Careers

On successful completion of the programme you will be awarded a BA (Hons) degree in Applied Social Science, Community Development and Youth Work; a professional qualification recognised by the National Youth Agency (NYA) and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers (JNC).

The programme can lead to careers in the broad community development, community and youth work field in statutory, voluntary and independent sectors. Former students have gone on to work as:

  • managers and staff in community projects
  • youth officers
  • community development workers
  • substance misuse workers
  • youth workers in a range of settings, including schools and youth offending teams
  • learning mentors

They have also worked in the following areas:

  • international development projects
  • setting up their own projects and organisations
  • community cohesion projects
  • multi faith work
  • community work
  • innovative projects within schools
  • community arts projects
  • youth offending teams
  • field of conflict transformation

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths. You can also find out more about specific career paths open to you after you graduate in our Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies careers page.

Learning & teaching

On this degree you'll attend lectures and seminars where you'll hear about ideas and concepts related to specific topics, and where you'll be encouraged to discuss and debate the issues raised. This will enhance your academic knowledge of the subject, and will improve your communication skills. You'll also attend tutorials, training meetings and workshops, and will carry out fieldwork and practical exercises. You will also be required to engage in reading, preparing topics for discussion,  producing essays and  project work.

We want you to be inspired to read more beyond the core reading, to develop your own ideas, and to find the evidence that will back them up. Independent study requires excellent motivation and time management skills. These skills will stay with you for life, and are the kind of transferable skills that are highly sought after by employers. 

Learning and teaching on this degree will take place through:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Fieldwork
  • Group and individual tutorials
  • Group work training meetings
  • Workshops
  • Practical exercises
  • Independent learning
  • Assessments

Find out more about these learning and teaching approaches.

Student profiles

Natalie

Goldsmiths is notorious for nurturing creative thinkers who aspire to learn through pioneering and artistically applied approaches; transforming students into well practiced professionals.

Goldsmiths is notorious for nurturing creative thinkers who aspire to learn through pioneering and artistically applied approaches; transforming students into well practiced professionals. I chose Goldsmiths because I wanted to be a part of that. I sought after the best Youth Work programme in London to develop my skills as well as to receive a positive, fun, inclusive and diverse experience. The campus is a friendly and vibrant environment with year-round activities, exciting events and special occasions both within and outside of our faculty. I know I made the right decision studying at Goldsmiths because now I am a graduate – I miss being a part of it so much.

Every academic year out of the three is different. It’s not like school or college, this course retrains you to be an independent thinker, to challenge, question and test everything you knew before… you are not simply on an educational journey… but more essentially you are on a journey to discover, undo and re-build oneself; to be your best self when supporting vulnerable members of the wider community. You consciously reflect about making judgements and assumptions of others: gender, race, culture and societal background, so to aid others in reaching self-actualisation and ultimately make positive contributions to society. Overall my experience studying at Goldsmiths was emotionally and mentally challenging yet a milestone in creating a comprehensive, professional and balanced youth work practitioner.

Having the opportunity to complete fieldwork practice each year on the programme propels Goldsmiths BA (Hons) Community Development Youth Work students into the industry with a wealth of applied practical experience.

The skills I have acquired are countless… the personal and professional relationships I have gained are immeasurable. I now practice youth work with an empathetic, specialised assertiveness thanks to my studies at Goldsmiths.

Clarence

"This degree is especially tailored for critical thinking and reflection."

"It challenges my perception, ways of thinking, way of life, choices and behaviour in relation to the social issues within our community and society. Through participation and interaction, it challenges me to develop self awareness and critical consciousness and bring out the best of my intellect and skills.

The department is very supportive and always willing to help me achieve my goals. I chose to come here to because of its reputation for being one of the best universities for youth and community development."

Perrie

"Goldsmiths cares and believes in their students, the community is fantastic."

"I believe young people can do great things because for me, failure is not an option. My main aim is to encourage young people, to take up leadership roles, and not get dragged in to the stereotypical view, by doing something constructive that will allow a bright future, with nothing but success.

Before coming to Goldsmiths, I have been peer youth leader for Ubuntu Social Living Networks, which encourages positive thinking in young people. The project is inspired by the challenges facing young people of African/African-Caribbean heritage. I want to see the youth in my community doing well in all aspects of their day to day lives, whether it be at school, at home, or in their social lives.

Lewisham Borough, my hometown... What can I say? Having grown up around Grime Music & Lewisham Peoples Day, my passion for the community has grown ever since. Being accepted at Goldsmiths and blessed to have received a Lewisham Fee Waiver will enable me to build on the skills I've gained through the projects I have been part of, to gain a better knowledge of my chosen study. Goldsmiths cares and believes in their students, the community is fantastic. Anybody looking to study here, don't think twice, this is the right place for you. Believe in your SELF and put your thoughts into action."

Fees & funding

Related content links

University statistics for this course