Kiran Grewal

Staff details

Position Reader
Department Sociology
Email k.grewal (@gold.ac.uk)
Kiran Grewal

Kiran is a Reader in Human Rights in the Department of Sociology. A qualified lawyer, Kiran has worked as a scholar, practitioner and activist in the areas of refugee law, sexual and gender-based violence, torture prevention, policing and international criminal law in Australia, Sierra Leone, Kosovo, Nepal and Sri Lanka.

Kiran’s research is particularly concerned with the interactions between legal frameworks and social justice struggles of marginalized and/or subaltern groups. She is also generally interested in postcolonial, subaltern and feminist approaches to human rights, law, sexual and gender-based violence and transitional justice. She is the author of two books: The Socio-Political Practice of Human Rights (Routledge 2016) and Racialised Gang Rape and the Reinforcement of Dominant Order: Discourses of Gender, Race and Nation (Routledge 2017).

Kiran is currently working on a project entitled, ‘The Everyday Life of Human Rights’ focused on subaltern engagements with the language and institutions of human rights in post-war Sri Lanka.

Teaching

Kiran is the Convenor of the MA in Human Rights, Culture and Social Justice.

Areas of Supervision

Kiran is interested in supervising projects on human rights, humanitarianism, transitional justice, feminist, postcolonial, decolonial and subaltern theory and politics. She is also interested in projects that adopt a socio-legal approach: looking at the relationship between legal and social norms.

 

 

Research Interests

  • Human rights
  • Humanitarianism
  • Postcolonial, subaltern and decolonial theory and politics
  • Feminist theory and politics
  • Transitional justice
  • Sri Lanka/South Asia
  • Socio-legal theory and methodologie

Publications

Book

Grewal, Kiran. 2016. Racialised Gang Rape and the Reinforcement of Dominant Order: Discourses of Gender, Race and Nation. Oxon: Routledge. ISBN 9781472414991

Grewal, Kiran. 2016. The Socio-Political Practice of Human Rights: Between the Universal and the Particular. Oxon: Routledge. ISBN 9781472414892

Book Section

Grewal, Kiran and Munasinghe, Vidura. 2016. Human rights and everyday practices of policing in post-war Sri Lanka. In: Leanne Weber; Elaine Fishwick and Marinella Marmo, eds. The Routledge International Handbook of Criminology and Human Rights. Oxon: Routledge. ISBN 9781138931176

Grewal, Kiran. 2016. Can the Subaltern Speak within International Law? Women’s Rights Activism, International Legal Institutions and the Power of ‘Strategic Misunderstanding’. In: , ed. Negotiating Normatively: Postcolonial Appropriations, Contestations and Transformations. Cham: Springer, pp. 27-44. ISBN 978-3-319-30983-5

Grewal, Kiran. 2012. International Criminal Justice: Advancing the Cause of Women’s Rights? The Example of the Special Court for Sierra Leone. In: Tonia St Germain and Susan Dewey, eds. Conflict-Related Sexual Violence: International Law, Local Responses. Sterling, VA: Kumarian Press. ISBN 978-1565495043

Dagistanli, Selda and Grewal, Kiran. 2012. Perverse Muslim Masculinities in Contemporary Orientalist Discourse: The Vagaries of Muslim Immigration in the West. In: George Morgan and Scott Poynting, eds. Global Islamophobia: Muslims and Moral Panic in the West. Oxon: Routledge. ISBN 9781138273429

Grewal, Kiran. 2011. ‘The Natives Strike Back’ – L’Appel des Indigènes de la République and the Death of Republican values in Postcolonial France. In: Jo McCormack; Alistair Rolls and Murray Pratt, eds. Hexagonal Variations: Diversity, Plurality and Reinvention in Contemporary France. Amsterdam: Rodopi, pp. 223-244. ISBN 9789042032460

Article

Grewal, Kiran K. 2018. Do we need human rights law? The Conversation,

Grewal, Kiran. 2015. International Criminal Law as a Site for Enhancing Women’s Rights? Challenges, Possibilities, Strategies. Feminist Legal Studies, 23(2), pp. 149-165. ISSN 0966-3622

Grewal, Kiran. 2014. Rape in Conflict, Rape in Peace: Questioning the Revolutionary Potential of International Criminal Justice for Women’s Human Rights. Australian Feminist Law Journal, 33(1), pp. 57-79. ISSN 1320-0968

Celermajer, D. and Grewal, Kiran. 2013. Preventing Human Rights Violations 'From the Inside': Enhancing the Role of Human Rights Education in Security Sector Reform. Journal of Human Rights Practice, 5(2), pp. 243-266. ISSN 1757-9619

Grewal, Kiran. 2012. Reclaiming the Voice of the ‘Third World Woman’. Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, 14(4), pp. 569-590. ISSN 1369-801X

Grewal, Kiran. 2012. Australia, the Feminist Nation? Discourses of Gender, ‘Culture’ and Nation in the ‘K Brothers’ Gang Rapes. Journal of Intercultural Studies, 33(5), pp. 509-528. ISSN 0725-6868

Grewal, Kiran. 2012. The Protection of Sexual Autonomy under International Criminal Law: The International Criminal Court and the Challenge of Defining Rape. Journal of International Criminal Justice, 10(2), pp. 373-396. ISSN 1478-1387

Grewal, Kiran. 2009. "VA T'FAIRE INTÉGRER!": THEAPPEL DES FÉMINISTES INDIGÈNES AND THE CHALLENGE TO "REPUBLICAN VALUES" IN POSTCOLONIAL FRANCE. Contemporary French Civilization, 33(2), pp. 105-133. ISSN 0147-9156

Report

Grewal, Kiran and Celermajer, D.. 2015. Issues Paper 3: Human Rights in the Sri Lankan Law Enforcement and Security Sector. Project Report. Enhancing Human Rights Protections in the Security Sector in the Asia Pacific.

Grewal, Kiran and Celermajer, D.. 2015. Issues Paper 4: Human Rights in the Nepali Law Enforcement and Security Sector. Project Report. Enhancing Human Rights Protections in the Security Sector in the Asia Pacific.

Munasinghe, Vidura; Ariyarathne, Kaushalya; Chandrasekera, Thilini; Celermajer, D. and Grewal, Kiran. 2015. Issues Paper 9: Human Rights in the Sri Lankan Law Enforcement Sector – Puttalam District. Project Report. Enhancing Human Rights Protections in the Security Sector in the Asia Pacific.

Other

Grewal, Kiran. 2017. To change torture practices, we must change the entire system. Open Democracy.

Grewal, Kiran. 2016. Creativity and resilience: how do war survivors make transitional justice work for them?. The Conversation.