Dr Nick Taylor

Staff details

Position Lecturer in Political Economy
Email N.taylor (@gold.ac.uk)
Dr Nick Taylor

Nick Taylor is a political economist with research interests in the history of the welfare state, history of economic thought and ecological political economy. His work is currently split between a focus on the political economy of work and labour markets, and on the political economy of climate-related risk within the financial sector. He has published research on comparative political economy, austerity, employment services and the benefits system in the UK, the cultural political economy of financialization, and sustainability and the financial professions.

Nick is the Deputy Director of the Political Economy Research Centre (PERC) and was a Research Fellow for the ESRC-sponsored Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP) from 2016-20, working with Prof. Will Davies. Prior to this, he was awarded an Early Career Fellowship by the Institute of Advanced Study at Warwick (2015-16.

 Academic Qualifications

  • PhD in Politics and International Studies, PAIS, University of Warwick
  • MA in Politics, University of Warwick
  • MA in International Political Economy, University of Warwick
  • BA in International Relations, University of Sussex.

Teaching

Nick convenes Issues in Cultural Political Economy, International Political Economy and the Work Placement module, and has co-convened the BA PPE programme at Undergraduate level. At postgraduate he convenes the core module, The Political Economy of the Anthropocene. He is interested in critical pedagogy and widening political economy debates beyond the university and has been involved in several initiatives relating to this objective.

Supervision

Nick is currently the Department’s Postgraduate Research Convenor. He is co-supervising PhD students on social entrepreneurship discourses in Germany and on pastoral political economy in the Horn of Africa.

He welcomes applications on the political economy of work, welfare and unemployment, on the history of the welfare state, political economy of the Anthropocene and ecological political economy, and on finance and sustainability.

Recent Work/Selected Work

Davies, Will; Dutta, Sahil; Taylor, Nick and Tazzioli, Martina (2022) Unprecedented? How Covid-19 revealed the politics of our economy, London: Goldsmiths Press.

Taylor, Nick and Davies, Will . 2021. The Financialization of Anti-capitalism? The case of the ‘Financial Independence Retire Early’ Community. Journal of Cultural Economy, ISSN 1753-0350

Taylor, Nick ; Jones, Aled; Hafner, Sarah and Kitchen, Joanna. 2021. Finance for a future of sustainable prosperity. Area, 53(1), pp. 21-29.

Taylor, Nick (2018) ‘The Return of Character: Parallels between late-Victorian and twenty-first century discourses’, Sociological Research Online, 23(2): 399-415.

Taylor, Nick (2017) ‘A Job, Any Job: The UK Benefits System and Employment Services in an Age of Austerity’, Observatoire de la Société Britannique, 19: 267-285.

Taylor, Nick (2014) ‘Theorising Capitalist Diversity: the uneven and combined development of labour forms’, Capital & Class, 38(1): 123-135.

Grants and Awards

Nick has been awarded an ESRC (1+3) Studentship (2010-14) and an IAS Early Career Fellowship (2015-16).

Publications

Book

Davies, Will; Dutta, Sahil Jai; Taylor, Nick and Tazzioli, Martina. 2022. Unprecedented? How COVID-19 Revealed the Politics of Our Economy. London: Goldsmiths Press. ISBN 9781913380120

Article

Taylor, Nick; Jones, Aled; Hafner, Sarah and Kitchen, Joanna. 2021. Finance for a future of sustainable prosperity. Area, 53(1), pp. 21-29. ISSN 0004-0894

Taylor, Nicholas and Davies, Will. 2021. The Financialization of Anti-capitalism? The case of the ‘Financial Independence Retire Early’ Community. Journal of Cultural Economy, 14(6), pp. 694-710. ISSN 1753-0350

Taylor, Nicholas. 2017. 'A Job, Any Job' : The UK Benefits System and Employment Services in an Age of Austerity. Observatoire de la société britannique, 19, pp. 267-285.

Taylor, Nicholas. 2014. Theorising capitalist diversity: The uneven and combined development of labour forms. Capital & Class, 38(1), pp. 129-141. ISSN 0309-8168