Staff in the Department of Psychology

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Photo of Dr Robert Brotherton

Dr Robert Brotherton

Visiting Fellow
r.brotherton (@gold.ac.uk)+44 (0)20 7919 7175

My primary research area concerns the psychology of conspiracy theories. Why are conspiracy theories so widespread? What makes them appealing? Why are some people particularly drawn to them? What are the consequences of conspiracy theories for believers, and for the wider community? More generally, I am interested in anomalistic psychology, which includes belief in the paranormal, superstitions, religiosity, and pseudoscience.

As conspiracy theories often arise even before the facts of an event are known and are generally regarded by the consensus of legitimate experts as being implausible, it seems that conspiracist beliefs are not always a result of rational evaluation of evidence. Regardless of the objective truth or untruth of any particular conspiracist claim, my research is directed towards exploring the potential role of psychological factors, such as cognitive biases and heuristics, personality and individual differences, and social psychological factors. I am also interested in the transmission and consequences of conspiracy theories.

Academic qualifications

BSc MSc PhD

Areas of supervision

I welcome projects focusing on the formation, maintenance, transmission, and consequences of conspiracy theories or other anomalous beliefs, e.g.

  • The role of socio-cognitive biases, such as the intentionality bias, proportionality bias, conjunction fallacy, etc.
  • The influence of personality and individual difference factors, such as self-efficacy, paranoia, and schizotypal traits.
  • Social psychological aspects, such as persuasion and attitude formation.
  • Looking at the links between conspiracy theories and other claims, such as rumours, urban legends, gossip, superstition, and religion.
  • Determining the psychological functions of anomalous beliefs, and the wider consequences for society.

See my research outputs on Goldsmiths Research Online.

Photo of Laura Crane

Laura Crane

Postdoctoral Research Associate
l.crane (@gold.ac.uk)

Dr Laura Crane completed her undergraduate and postgraduate studies at Goldsmiths, University of London (2005-2009), where she conducted research on autobiographical memory in autistic adults.

Since then, Laura has extended this work in two applied areas. First, Laura has led a programme of work (at Goldsmiths, University of London) exploring the experiences of receiving and communicating a diagnosis of autism. Second, Laura is working on a large-scale research study (at City University London) exploring ways of supporting child witnesses (with and without an autism diagnosis) within the criminal justice system. Complementing her research roles, Laura is an Honorary Lecturer at the Centre for Research in Autism and Education at UCL’s Institute of Education, and an Associate Lecturer with the Department of Psychology at Goldsmiths.

Research interests

Experiences of receiving and communicating a diagnosis of neurodevelopmental conditions ( including autism spectrum disorder and developmental coordination disorder).

Autism and the criminal justice system: identifying ways to support child witnesses with and without autism spectrum disorder, as well as exploring experiences of autism and policing.

Knowledge, awareness and experience of autism; surveying legal professionals, GPs and teachers.  

Teaching

Modules taught on:BSc Psychology :PS53031B Neurodevelopmental Disorders, MSc Clinical and Cognitive Neuroscience: PS70144C Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, MSC Foundation in Clinical Psychology : PS71056A Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Areas of supervision

Dr Laura Crane is available to supervise MSc students on topics relating to autism (or other neurodevelopmental conditions), as well as memory (partcilularly autobiographical) and criminal justice. Students should email her for an appointment.

Featured work

  • Crane, L., Maras, K., Hawken, T., Mulcahy, S., & Memon, A. (in press). Experiences of autism spectrum disorder and policing in England and Wales: surveying police and the autism community. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
  • Crane, L., Chester, J., Goddard, L., Henry, L.A., & Hill, E.L. (2016). Experiences of autism diagnosis: A survey of over 1000 parents in the United Kingdom. Autism: The International Journal of Research and Practice, 20(2), 153-162 [video summary]
  • Alonso-Soriano, C., Hill, E.L., & Crane, L. (2015). Surveying parental experiences of receiving a diagnosis of developmental coordination disorder. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 43-44, 11-20
  • Jones, L., Goddard, L., Hill, E.L., Henry, L.A., & Crane, L. (2014). Experiences of receiving an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis: A survey of adults in the United Kingdom. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(12), 3033-3044.

See my research outputs on Goldsmiths Research Online.

Photo of Prof John Gruzelier

Prof John Gruzelier

Professorial Research Fellow
j.gruzelier (@gold.ac.uk)+44 (0)20 7919 2221

John Gruzelier is Emeritus Professor of Psychology, joining Goldsmiths as a Professorial Research Fellow in 2006 from the medical faculty of Imperial College London where he had a department of Cognitive Neuroscience before its merger with the Division of Neuroscience and Mental Health.

Keywords for research include: EEG-Neurofeedback, Cognitive Peak Performance, Creativity, Performing Arts, EEG oscillations, Brain & Hypnosis, Self-Hypnosis/Visualisation & Immune Function, Energy Medicine, Schizophrenia, Schizotypy.

Keywords for current research include:

  • EEG-Neurofeedback
  • Cognitive Peak Performance
  • Performing Arts
  • Creativity
  • EEG Oscillations
  • Brain & Hypnosis
  • Self-Hypnosis/Visualisation and Immune Function
  • Energy Medicine
  • Schizophrenia & Schizotypy

Validation has been an over riding concern.

Recent Funding:

  • National Endowment for Science, Technology & Arts (NESTA) "Making Waves": application of neurofeedback to novice and advanced musical performance in adults and children and to examine effects on learning, creativity, well-being and academic performance: www.nesta.org.uk/ourawardees/profiles/5528/index.html with Trinity College of Music, Goldsmiths, ARK.www.arkschools.org
  • EU 6th Framework Programme, Emerging Technologies, Presenccia, WP ”Creative Presence States”.
    This incorporated Virtual Reality with neurofeedback and applications included dance (Laban), acting, etc. Virtual Reality was incorporated with visualisation and self-hypnosis.
  • EU Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) network on Electrical neuronal oscillations and cognition (ENOC). www.manu.edu.mk/costb27/
  • German Science Council (DFG), with Niels Birbaumer & Martin Lotze funding Boris Kleber to apply EEG-biofeedback to singers from Stuttgart Opera and Stuttgart Music Conservatory, and to include fMRI assessment.
  • Korean Institute of Brain Science grant for validation of outcome of Brain Wave Vibration versus complimentary yoga/meditation practices (Inyengar, Mindfulness) and EEG studies.
  • NIHR Research for Patient Benefit. With Drs Smithard & Lalit (Kings), Linnell (Goldsmiths) neurofeedback based intervention to reduce neglect and improve function in stroke patients.
  • PhD fellowship for Dr Max Chen from School of Medicine, Chang Gung University nd Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, for application of acutaneous stimulation with neurofeedback on attention .
  • PhD fellowship for Tomas Ros from Brain Health, London for application of neurofeedback to chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • ESRC PhD award for Helen Brinston with Dr Karina Linnell for application of neurofeedback to stroke.

Academic activities include:

  • President, Society for Applied Neuroscience (SAN), www.applied-neuroscience.org
  • Vice-president, Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) B27 Electrical neuronal oscillations and cognition, www.manu.edu.mk/costb27/
  • Editor, Contemporary Hypnosis, an international journal of the British Society for Experimental and Clinical Hypnosis. www.crownhouse.co.uk
  • 270 scientific publications on topics aside form the above interests, topics from his earlier career: the cognitive neuroscience of schizophrenia, psychosis-proneness, brain lateralisation, hypnosis, stress-related and immune disorders (HSV-2 and HIV) and recreational drugs (ecstacy).
  • PhD students: Deborah Bowden, Helen Brinson, Max Chen, Joseph Leach, Akira Naito (ICL), Tomas Ros, Tony Steffert,

Professional Awards, Editorships, Officer Posts in Scientific Societies:

  • 2004 the Ernest R. Hilgard award of the International Hypnosis Society for lifetime Scientific Excellence.
  • 2001 the best clinical paper award of the US Society of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis.
  • Co-editor of the International Journal of Psychophysiology since its inception in 1984 until 2004.
  • Member of Editorial Boards of European Psychologist, the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis and the Journal of Neurotherapy.
  • Board of Governors of the International Organisation of Psychophysiology.
  • Fellow British Psychological Society, International Organisation of Psychophysilogy, Royal Society of Arts.
  • A past president of the British Psychophysiology Society.
  • A past vice-president of the European Federation of Psychophysiological Societies.

Academic qualifications

B.A. Psychology, Auckland University, New Zealand, 1965.
M.A. Honours Psychology, Auckland University, New Zealand, 1968.
Ph.D. Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London, England, 1973.
Honorary Visiting Professor and Associate, Institute for Medical Psychology & Behavioural Neurobiology, University of Tuebingen, Germany.

  • Fellow of the British Psychological Society.
  • Fellow of the International Organisation of Psychophysiology.
  • Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.
  • Fellow of the British Society of Clinical and Academic Hypnosis.

Teaching

Doctoral students: Goldsmiths

  • Tomas Ros, full-time. Optimising perceptuo-motor performance and learning with EEG neurofeedback. Co-supervisor Karina Linnell. Completed 2010.
  • Deborah Bowden, full-time. Controlled studies of the efficacy of Reiki healing. (Co-supervisor Lorna Goddard) Submitted July, 2010.
  • Max Chen, full-time Electrostimulation Contingencies and Attention, Electrocortical Activity and Neurofeedback. To submit September, 2010.
  • Joseph Leach, full-time Neurofeedback and creative singing performance. To submit 2011.
  • Helen Brinson, full-time (EPSRC) Neurofeedback as a rehabilitative intervention in stroke-induced visual neglect. (Karina Linnell primary supervisor). Currently year 3.
  • Assistant Clinical Psychologist, Tokanui Psychiatric Hospital, New Zealand, December 1965-February 1966.

Postgraduate supervision: CX/ICL

John Connolly, Postdoctoral studies (1976-1978): Augmenting-reducing in cortical event related potentials in schizophrenia.

Jeff Jutai, Canada, Postdoctoral studies (1982-1985): Electrocortical topography in schizophrenia.

Frank Eves, PhD awarded 1985: Individual differences in cardiovascular adjustment elicited by high intensity auditory stimulation in humans.

Sheila Stevens, PhD awarded 1989: Cognitive response style and individual differences in psychophysiology in schizophrenia.

John Prescott, Australia, postgraduate studies 1979-1981: Augmenting-reducing in auditory evoked potentials in schizophrenia.

Mathew Mathews, M Phil awarded 1991: Auditory sensory functions and hallucinations in schizophrenia.

Ashley Conway, PhD awarded 1993: Hypnotically induced triggers for hyperventilation.

Adrian Burgess, PhD awarded 1996.: The reliability and validity of EEG topographical mapping.

Jochan Kaiser, Ph.D awarded 1995-1998.: EEG coherence in relation to age at puberty.

Tobias Egner, PhD awarded 1999-2002: Learned self-regulation of EEG frequency components and its effects on electrocortical, cognitive and music performance.

Corinna Haenschel, PhD awarded 1998-2002: Gamma and beta frequencies in response to novel auditory stimuli.

Nick Cooper, PhD awarded 1999-2003: EEG in relation to in internally and externally directed attention.

Akira Naito, PhD, 2001-2004: The influence of psychological intervention upon neuro-endocrine-immune interaction.

Presentations and exhibitions

Exhibition

  • Science Museum, S Kensington, Neurobotics exhibition, October – March 2007 (http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/antenna/neurobotics/smart/118.asp)

Keynote lectures

While at Goldsmiths 2006-2010

  • Enhancing music performance with EEG-neurofeedback. Macedonian Academy of Arts and Sciences. Skopje, Macedonia. June, 2006.
  • Enhancing function through mind-body connections. International meeting on Higher Sensory Functions, Seoul, S. Korea. July, 2006.
  • Hypnosis: The brain, immune system and therapy. Keynote, Dutch Hypnosis 75th Jubilee meeting, Utecht, April, 2007.
  • The Brain and Hypnosis: Therapeutic Implications. Keynote, German Hypnosis Society, Bad Lippspringe, November, 2007.
  • Enhancing music and dance performance with EEG-neurofeedback. Keynote, 1st International Symposium on Performance Science, Oporto, November, 2007.
  • Self-hypnosis and beyond. Waxman memorial lecture. Royal Society of Medicine, Section Hypnosis & Psychosomatic Medicine. December, 2007.
  • Gruzelier, J. Thomson, T., Steffert, T., Bowden, D. Health, Well-being & Immune Up-Regulation with Self-Hypnosis & Reiki. Symposium, European Society of Hypnosis, triennial meeting, August, 2008, Vienna.
  • Gruzelier, J. Neural efficiency and hypnotisability. European Society of Hypnosis, triennial meeting ,Vienna, August, 2008.
  • Performance enhancement with EEG-neurofeedback. LCASE symposium British Association of Orchestras, Somerset Hs, June, 2008.
  • Gruzelier, J.H. Maximising potential with brain wave training. Korean Institute of Brain Science, Seoul, 6th November, 2008.
  • The mind-body connection and healing. Health, Mental Health and Exceptional Human Experiences, Liverpool Hope University.July, 2009.
  • Gruzelier, JH, Steffert, T, Thompson.T. Controlled trials of 2 and 3D virtual reality-assisted creative immune-visualisation self-hypnosis training. International Society of Hypnosis, Rome, September, 2009.
  • Realising educational potential through EEG-Neurofeedback training. Public lecture, University of Malta, September, 2009

Conferences

  • Tony Steffert, Annie Frick, Martin Batty, Malcolm Hawken, Claire Sturge, Katherine Loveday, John Gruzelier. A controlled comparison of EEG-neurofeedback and attention training for children with ADHD. Society for Applied Neuroscience, Swansea. September, 2006.
  • Boris Kleber, John Gruzelier, Martin Lotze, Niels Birbaumer. EEG-neurofeedback training of elite singers including fMRI assessments. Society for Applied Neuroscience, Swansea. September, 2006.
  • John Gruzelier. Theta circuitry and implications for peak performance. Society for Applied Neuroscience, Swansea, September, 2006.
  • Tomas Ros, Philip Bloom, Larry Benjamin, Merrick Moseley, John Gruzelier. Neurofeedback Peak Performance Training in Microsurgery: A controlled study. Society for Applied Neuroscience, Swansea, September, 2006.
  • John Gruzelier, Hawken, M.B., Bonnington, S., Tang, B-K., & Batty, M.J. Relaxation strategies and enhancement of hypnotic susceptibility: neurofeedback, self-hypnosis and progressive muscle relaxation. Society for Applied Neuroscience, Swansea, September, 2006.
  • Joe Leach, Kate Bulpin, Shama Khan, Alex Rass, Claire Nelson, John Gruzelier. Controlled study of neurofeedback with novice singers. Society for Applied Neuroscience, Swansea, September., 2006 (poster).
  • EEG-neurofeedback for peak performance: Evidence & theory. Neuroscience Today, Florence, March, 2007.
  • B. Kleber, J. Gruzelier, M Bensch, R. Vait, M. Lotze, N. Birbaumer. fMRI correlates of professional singing after neurofeedback training. Applied Neuroscience conference, Nijmegen, May, 2007.
  • J. Leach, K. Bulpin, S. Rahman, A. Rass,T. Chamorro-Premuzic, J. Gruzelier. Increased self-regulation of EEG theta/alpha ratio discloses a differential effect of neurofeedback training on creativity measures. Applied Neuroscience conference, Nijmegen, May, 2007.
  • T. Ros, P. Bloom, L. Benjamin, M. Moseley, M. Hawken, L. Parkinson, J. Gruzelier. Neurofeedback Peak Performance Training in Microsurgery. Applied Neuroscience conference, Nijmegen, May, 2007.
  • T. Thompson, T. Steffert, J. Gruzelier The effect of creative visualisation training on immune function. Applied Neuroscience conference, Nijmegen, May, 2007.
  • John Gruzelier, Tomas Ros, Philip Bloom, Neurofeedback and microsurgery performance. 150th Ann Western Eye Hospital. November, 2007.
  • Steffert, T., Steed, A., Leach, J., Thompson, T., & Gruzelier, J. (2008). SMR training with an ecologically valid displayPublished Revista Espanola de Neuropsicologia, 10, 77.
  • Thompson, T., Steffert, T., Redding, E., & Gruzelier, J. (2008). The effect of alpha-theta and heart-rate coherence training on creative dance performance. Society of Applied Neuroscience, second biennial meeting, Seville. Published Revista Espanola de Neuropsicologia, 10, 60.
  • Gruzelier J, Steffert T, Leach J, Thompson T (2008). Alpha/theta versus SMR training at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. . Society of Applied Neuroscience, second biennial meeting, Seville. Revista Espanola de Neuropsicologia, 10, 59.
  • Leach J, Holmes P, Hirst L, Gruzelier P (2008). Alpha/theta versus SMR training for novice singers/advanced instrumentalists. . Society of Applied Neuroscience, second biennial meeting, Seville. Revista Espanola de Neuropsicologia, 10, 62.
  • Kleber, B., Gruzelier, J., Bensch, M., Birbaumer, N. (2008) Effects of EEG-Biofeedback on professional singing performances. . Society of Applied Neuroscience, second biennial meeting, Seville. Revista Espanola de Neuropsicologia, 10, 77. 61.
  • Ros, T., Bloom, P., Benjamin, L., Moselely, M., Parkinson, L., & Gruzelier, J. (2008). Optimising microsurgical skills with EEG-neurofeedback. . Society of Applied Neuroscience, second biennial meeting, Seville. Revista Espanola de Neuropsicologia, 10, 97-101.
  • Brinson H, Gruzelier J, Linnell K, Kalra L and Steffert T (2008). A controlled pilot study of the efficacy of neurofeedback in enhancing attention in middle-aged participants. . Society of Applied Neuroscience, second biennial meeting, Seville. Revista Espanola de Neuropsicologia, 10, 77. 125.
  • Chen M, Gruzelier J, Steffert T, Thompson T, Leach J (2008). Combining transcutaneous electrical acupuncture with neurofeedback training: effects on cognitive performance and EEG spectrum. . Society of Applied Neuroscience, second biennial meeting, Seville. Revista Espanola de Neuropsicologia, 10, 77. 140.
  • Chen M, Gruzelier J, Steffert T, Thompson T, Leach J (2008). Effects of transcutaneous acupuncture stimulation on repetitive visual Go/No Go ERPs and sustained attention. Society of Applied Neuroscience, second biennial meeting, Seville. Revista Espanola de Neuropsicologia, 10, 77. 153 -154.
  • Ros, T., Bloom, P., Moseley, M., Benjamin, L., Parkinson, L., Gruzelier, J. Optimising microsurgical skills with EEG neurofeedback. Presentation to International Society of Neuronal Regulation (ISNR), San Antonio, Texas, October .Published Journal of Neurotherapy, September, 2008.
  • Efficacy of neurofeedback with contemporary dancers. Trinity/Laban February, 2009
  • Alpha/theta neurofeedback, creative performance enhancement, long distance functional connectivity and psychological integration. Mind & Brain VI: Neuroplasticity of Brain & Behaviour, Dubrovnik:April, 2009
  • Max Chen, John Gruzelier: Beneficial effects of electrostimulation contingencies on sustained attention, ERPs and EEG. Mind & Brain VI: Neuroplasticity of Brain & Behaviour, Dubrovnik:April, 2009
  • Alpha/theta neurofeedback, creative performance enhancement, long distance functional connectivity and psychological integration. Mind & Brain VI: Neuroplasticity of Brain & Behaviour, Dubrovnik:April, 2009
  • Tomas Ros, John Gruzelier: Elucidation of CNS mechanisms of beta frequency
  • neurofeedback training with TMS. Mind & Brain VI: Neuroplasticity of Brain & Behaviour, Dubrovnik:April, 2009
  • Tony Steffert, Atsuko Inoue, John Gruzelier: VR immersion and faster-wave neurofeedback.
  • Joseph leach, John Gruzelier: Beneficial effects of Alpha/theta neurofeedback on non-expert singing and expert instrumental performance. Mind & Brain VI: Neuroplasticity of Brain & Behaviour, Dubrovnik:April, 2009
  • Tony Steffert, Atsuko Inoue, John Gruzelier: VR immersion and faster-wave neurofeedback.
  • Joseph leach, John Gruzelier: Beneficial effects of Alpha/theta neurofeedback on non-expert singing and expert instrumental performance. Mind & Brain VI: Neuroplasticity of Brain & Behaviour, Dubrovnik:April, 2009.

Television and video output

Exhibitions / media 2006-

  • Science Museum, S Kensington, Neurobotics exhibition, October – March 2007 (http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/antenna/neurobotics/smart/118.asp)
  • Scientific American commentary www.sciammind.com/
  • BBC1 Documentary, Make Me Smart, featured Gruzelier and neurofeedback. March, 2009, TV Malta.
  • Featured in Ode the magazine for optimists., March 2009
  • Gruzelier interviewed for 30 mins on neurofeedback and creativity. June, 2009.
  • TV documentary broadcast by South Korean TV on Creativity and Technical Innovation which included the neurofeedback and included a shoot in the UCL ReaCTor. March, 2010.

See my research outputs on Goldsmiths Research Online

Photo of Dr Hayley Leonard

Dr Hayley Leonard

Postdoctoral Research Associate
h.leonard (@gold.ac.uk)+44 (0)20 7078 5484

My main area of interest is cognitive development, particularly in neurodevelopmental disorders. Previous research focused on low level visual biases in face recognition in autism and Williams syndrome. My current research continues to investigate social-cognitive development in typical and atypical populations and its relationship with other domains, specifically motor development.

I am affiliated with the  Goldsmiths InfantLab (www.goldsmithsinfantlab.org), and am part of the Goldsmiths Action Lab. For information about the Action Lab's recent research, our January newsletter is available at http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/11212.

Teaching

BSc Psychology - PS53031B: Neurodevelopmental Disorders

MSc Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience - PS71044B: Developmental Cognitive Neuropsychology

MSc Foundations in Clinical Psychology & Health Services - PS71056A: Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Research interests

Neurodevelopmental Disorders:

I am interested in a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, and have conducted research with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Williams syndrome (WS) and Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD; sometimes called 'dyspraxia'), as well as with infants and children at-risk of developing ASD.

Social cognition:

Research includes investigations of spatial frequency biases for face recognition in typical development, as well as in children with ASD and WS. Most recently, I have worked in collaboration with Professor Elisabeth Hill and the British Autism Study of Infant Siblings (BASIS) network to investigate the relationships between social development (including face processing) and motor development in infants and children at-risk of developing ASD. I will also be collaborating with Professor Hill and Dr Emma Sumner on a grant from the Leverhulme Trust investigating the relationships between motor and social skills in children with ASD and DCD.

Motor development:

In a project funded by the Waterloo Foundation, Professor Hill and I have collaborated with Professor Lucy Henry at City University to investigate executive functioning in children with poor motor skills and those with a clinical diagnosis of DCD. A follow-up study is now being conducted, which is also supported by the Waterloo Foundation and a PhD stipend from City University to  Marialivia Bernardi. I am now conducting a study into social influences on typical motor development in infants, specifically focusing on the effect of older siblings on an infant's development.

For information about the Goldsmiths Action Lab's recent research, our January newsletter is available at http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/11212.

See my full research output on Goldsmiths Research Online.

Photo of Dr Jane Lessiter

Dr Jane Lessiter

Senior Research Psychologist, i2 media research, Research Fellow
(@gold.ac.uk)+44 (0)20 j.lessiter@gold.ac.uk

I specialise in research on the consumer experience of digital media products and services.

I have worked at i2 media research ltd. since it was founded in 2002. At i2, I specialise in research on the consumer experience of digital media products and services, and work across i2’s project portfolio on both commissioned and academic research. This has included:

  • development of assessments to measure quality of media experiences (e.g., ITC-Sense of Presence Inventory)
  • identification of user requirements and unmet needs from products and services
  • accessibility and usability considerations in product and service design with a particular interest in the experiences of people with visual impairment
  • user/consumer segmentations and exploration of respective drivers and barriers to product/service adoption and use
  • evaluation of marketing communications and information campaigns (e.g., conducting research for ITC, Ofcom, Digital UK, and Government departments to inform the successful roll out of digital television switchover)
  • collection and use of personal data for digital media products and services - issues of privacy, security and perceptions of risk

Academic qualifications

BSc PhD CPsychol

See my research outputs on Goldsmiths Research Online.

Dr Viv Moore BA MSc PhD Chart. Psych. ILTM

Honorary Research Fellow
v.moore (@gold.ac.uk)+44 (0)20 7919 7870

I was the principal investigator of an ESRC project grant with three years funding (R000239009, £130k). The focus of my research is to investigate the mechanism/s involved in learning new exemplars of information and to what extent the age and type of learning influence this process.

My major concern is the development of such mechanism/s. I am currently formulating a hypothesis to account for the empirical data and seeking neurologically plausible methods of implementing the data of the age or order of acquiring information and other important variables, e.g. cumulative frequency.